Thousands of genetic disorders including disabling or

This preview shows page 13 - 15 out of 17 pages.

Thousands of genetic disorders, including disabling or deadly hereditary diseases, are inherited as simple recessive traits.oThese conditions range from relatively mild (albinism) to life-threatening (cystic fibrosis).AlbinismAn allele that causes a recessive condition such as albinism codes for a malfunctioning protein or for no protein at all.Heterozygotes have a normal phenotype because one normal allele produces enough of the required protein.Albinism shows up only in homozygous individuals who inherit a recessive allele from each parent.Individuals who do not have the disorder are either homozygous dominant or heterozygotes.Although heterozygotes may lack obvious phenotypic effects, they are carriers who may transmit a recessive allele to their offspring.Most people with recessive disorders are born to carriers with normal phenotypes.oIn a mating between two carriers of albinism, each child has a 1/4 chance of inheriting the disorder, a 1/2 chance of being a carrier, and a 1/4 chance of being homozygous dominant.Genetic disorders are not evenly distributed among all groups of humans.This is due to the different genetic histories of the world’s people during times when populations were more geographically and genetically isolated.Normally, it is relatively unlikely that two carriers of the same rare, harmful allele will meet and mate.Consanguineous matings between close relatives increase the risk.oIndividuals who share a recent common ancestor are more likely to carry the same recessive alleles.oGeneticists disagree about the extent to which human consanguinity increases the risk of inherited diseases.Most societies and cultures have laws or taboos forbidding marriages between close relatives.Cystic FibrosisCystic fibrosis strikes one of every 2,500 whites of European descent.oOne in 25 people (4%) of European descent is a carrier for this condition.oThe normal allele at this gene codes for a membrane protein that transports chloride between cells and extracellular fluid.
oIf these channels are defective or absent, abnormally high extracellular levels of chloride accumulate.oThen the mucous coats of certain cells become thicker and stickier than normal.oThis mucous buildup in the pancreas, lungs, digestive tract, and elsewhere causes poor absorption of nutrients, chronic bronchitis, and bacterial infections.oThe extracellular chloride also contributes to infection by disabling a natural antibiotic made by some body cells.Without treatment, affected children die before age 5, but with treatment, they can live past their late 20s or even 30s.ooSickle-Cell DiseaseThe most common inherited disease among people of African descent is sickle-cell disease, which affects one of 400 African-Americans.oSickle-cell disease is caused by the substitution of a single amino acid in hemoglobin.oWhen oxygen levels in the blood of an affected individual are low, sickle-cell hemoglobin aggregates into long rods that deform red blood cells into a sickle shape.oThis sickling creates a cascade of symptoms, demonstrating the pleiotropic 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture