How bills become laws A bill is brought into either house and then assigned to

How bills become laws a bill is brought into either

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How bills become laws A bill is brought into either house and then assigned to a committee. The bill goes out of subcommittee and committee hearings if it is approved by a majority vote. The bill is then sent to the House or Senate floor, discussed, and voted upon. Here it is either approved by a majority vote or denied and is then sent to the other house to go through the same previously mentioned steps. When finished, both floors vote on the bill and once again it may be approved by a majority vote or rejected. The approved bill is then sent to the President and he can either veto the bill or sign it into law. If the President neither signs nor vetoes the bill, it becomes law in ten days. If the President vetoes a bill, it returns to Congress and the bill is then voted upon one last time and can be approved with a 2/3 majority vote, which means the President's veto is overturned and the bill becomes law (Krutz and Waskiewicz, 2017). Conclusion The Government was set up to work for everyone, the majority, the minority, everyone. Although there are many differences, the three branches were created to work together in the best interest of the nation and its people. Power is one of the most sought-after thing people desire and with the Separation of Power and checks and balances, this ensures that no one person or entity can gain absolute power. The Government and its inner workings are a wonderous thing making America a great place to live.
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6 References American Government (2019). Retrieved from American Government (2019). Retrieved from Krutz, G. and Waskiewicz, S. (2017). American Government. Retrieved from the University of Phoenix eBook Collection database Shmoop (2019). Retrieved from - congress.html
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  • Fall '15
  • Government, Separation of Powers, President of the United States, United States Congress

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