That they make up a closed and conservative community

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that they make up a closed and conservative community entirely separated from the outer world. Also, it is a very "unlarkinesque" poem; the poet said in 'Larkin at Fifty' that 'The Explosion' is not like him, or how he would like to be.
'The Explosion' is written in the rhythm of Longfellow's Hiawatha, as many critics have stated , and although according to Motion, Larkin did not realize this (394), this form is very consciously, more to say, forcefully applied to the whole poem. Although the poem has a strong rhythmic form, its triplets do not rhyme, which makes it a ballad of the miners (Swarbrick 149).The poem starts out in a Lawrentian miners' village (Whalen 59, Rácz 181), and turns into a tragedy. The wives are religious (praying as "they / Are sitting in God's house"), which may lead the reader to conclude that the husbands were equally devout. This might providean answer to the miracle at the end. Resurrection is only possible if the participants are truly religious in the same way as, for example, with the Stigmas (i.e.: if somebody believes, miracles can happen tohim or her). The description of an average day at the miners' colony is very calm, with the sun rising and the miners laughing while walking to the pit. This could be the rural ideal, where nobody is richbut everybody seems to be happy. The image that "one chased afterrabbits" makes the whole narrative livelier. Yet the images lead to the tragic outcome of the explosion with a Shakespearean dramaturgy (beginning with "on the day of the explosion").The first half of the poem is a descriptive narrative, while the secondhalf deals with the tragedy and rescue operations. The images can be associated to each other: the sun that was sleeping at the beginning is now on the zenith "scarved as in a heat-haze, dimmed".The "oath-edged talk" of the miners is earthly and everyday, while the prayer of the women is divine. The most beautiful image is in the last line, "one showing the eggs unbroken", that is associated with the third stanza ("Came back with a nest of lark's eggs; / Showed them; lodged them in the grasses"). These images outline the contrast between everyday life and the extraordinary event, which also leads to the dramaturgy mentioned above.The sixth stanza of the poem is the central one, in which the wives speak or think their true belief. It is a belief that is able to lead to a miracle even "for a second", even in a wondrous way. There is no true resurrection in the sense that people return from death. It is a resurrection in the sense of seeing human ascension, a resurrection in the Biblical sense. It is important to point out that this poem does not present Larkin's point of view, but a completely different community's. The poetic self and the real Larkin are usually two different entities. A spectacular example is 'The Wedding Wind', where he talks with a bride's voice, and where the experience of theascension might be either the acceptance of Christianity or an ironicillusion, a vision of resurrection (Rácz 181).

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