You have the responsibility to make decisions that

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you have the responsibility to make decisions that have the best possible effect on your well-being. When making decisions that involve potentially risky consequences, your health and safety come first. Respect yourself, stand by your values, and be assertive in your refusal. health.glencoe.com TOPIC Vocabulary Go to health.glencoe.com to review the vocabulary for this lesson. ACTIVITY Play the Chapter 12 concentration game. HS_HEALTH_U04_C12_L2 12/6/03 9:35 AM Page 309
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Assertive Refusal Being means standing up for your rights in a firm but positive way. When you practice assertive communication, you state your position and stand your ground while acknowledging the rights of others. This is the most effective approach when facing negative peer influences. Assertive teens are often role models for others because most people respect individuals who stay true to themselves. REFUSAL SKILLS An important aspect of being assertive is the ability to demon- strate appropriate refusal skills. are communication strategies that can help you say no when you are urged to take part in behaviors that are unsafe, unhealthy, or that go against your values. Effective refusal skills involve a three-step process. Learning and prac- ticing these steps will help you deal with high-pressure situations. Step 1: State Your Position. The first step in resisting negative peer pressure is to say no. You need to state your position simply and firmly. Make sure your “no” sounds as though you really mean it. Combining your words with non- verbal messages, such as those shown in Figure 12.2, will make your statement more effective. Having said no, give an honest reason for your response. Your reason may be as simple as, “It goes against my values.” Offering a legitimate reason will help strengthen your refusal. Refusal skills assertive 310 Chapter 12 Peer Relationships Stand your ground by stating your values and beliefs. Consider the consequences of unsafe behavior. Decide whether the source of pressure is yourself or others. Be assertive, and use refusal skills to say no to risky activities. Leave the scene if necessary. To resist negative peer pressure: Resisting Peer Pressure B ODY L ANGUAGE AND A SSERTIVE R EFUSAL Reinforce the meaning of your words with appropriate body language. Shaking your head is one way to communicate no. Raising your hand in a “Stop” or “No way” signal tells others that you are not interested. If the other person continues to pressure you, walk away from the situation.
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311 Lesson 2 Peer Pressure and Refusal Skills Assert Yourself Learning to be assertive can help you maintain your commitment to a healthful lifestyle. By practicing assertiveness, you will find it easier to live by your values. In this activity, you will role-play assertive communication skills.
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