4 behavioral style the behavioral style decision

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4. Behavioral Style:  The behavioral style decision maker is characterized by a low tolerance for  ambiguity and strong people and social concerns. These decision makers tend to work well with  others and like situations in which opinions are openly exchanged. They tend to be receptive to  suggestions, are supportive and warm, and prefer verbal to written information. They also tend to  avoid conflict and be overly concerned with keeping everyone happy. As a result, these decision  makers often have a difficult time saying no to people, and they do not like making tough decisions,  especially when it will result in someone being upset with the outcome. b)   Style Implications Research reveals that decision makers tend to have more than one dominant style. Typically  managers rely on two or three decision styles, and these will vary by occupation, job level, and  culture. These styles can be used to note the strong and weak points of decision makers. For  example, analytical decision makers make fast decisions, but they also tend to be autocratic in their  approach to doing things. Similarly, conceptual decision makers are innovative and willing to take  risks, but they are often indecisive. These styles also help explain why different managers will arrive  at different decisions after evaluating the same information. Overall, the analysis of decision-making  styles is useful in providing insights regarding how and why managers make decisions, as well as  offering practical guidelines regarding how to deal with various decision-making styles.   1.34 SUBTOPIC 4: Types of Decisions    Introduction; Some people prefer making decisions simply by intuition. They trust their “feelings” more than they  trust the analytical methods that require a systematic and mathematical comparative assessment of  competing actions that satisfy multiple criteria. Russo and Schoemaker 1989, Schick and Vaughn  1999 encourage people to avoid the use of intuition and instead, base their judgements and  decisions on reasoning strategies that are less likely to lead to common errors in reasoning. From  their perspective, decision-making should be a matter of calculation, not intuition.  
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Major to Russo et al and Schick et al arguments is that intuition-based decision-making can lead to  many problems. This however does not mean that calculation-based decisions as recommended by  psychologists and economists are free of some serious pitfalls. A synthesis of these two models has  been developed recently as a theory of emotional coherence.
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