In paragraphs three and fourteen he refers to many

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their own experiences when it comes to breaking bad or awkward news to an innocent child. In paragraphs three and fourteen, he refers to many different people and events within the Bible, where he talks about the connections between him and his brothers’ situation and the religious events mentioned. This connects to the clergymen’s own thoughts on their religious teachings and learnings. It makes them think about the connections between the situations and if they are actually accurate comparisons and if they are they would feel disgusted with themselves, as they are going against their own teachings. Throughout his whole letter, King gives a personal inside
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Long 5 view to what the average, African American man thinks about and has to go through. Many people go through hardships within their lives and it changes them, some for the better and some for the worse. This would connect to those people who have gone through or are going through hardships and are trying their best to make the most out of it. It makes the clergymen and the other readers think about how King is doing all he can to make the situation better for the people that he feels a kinship with. Martin Luther King, within his “Letter from Birmingham Jail (1963)”, uses rhetorical devices to elicit thoughts on how the clergymen’s way of going about segregation is wrong. King’s letter is convincing and influential, due to the wide range of topics he touched upon. The wide range would garner the attention of many people throughout the world, maybe even gaining support from others in those regions. With his use of ethos and pathos, he managed to cover many of the problems that African American people were having when this letter was written. This would make people be louder when it came to voicing their grievances, as ignorance or compliance to these problems could not be used as an excuse for either party involved, as King already put the problems out into the open. In addition to that, he even gave his own personal account and feelings on those subjects, which makes him seem more relatable to the clergymen and the people who would read it afterward. This would, again, widen the range that his letter and his people’s problems relate to. In the end, this, “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” was one of the many things that prove that Martin Luther King Junior was a genius when it came to persuasion.
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