S202_P3_6P_student copy.pdf

2012 pointed out that stages are not limited by age

Info icon This preview shows pages 8–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Gallahue et al. (2012) pointed out that stages are not limited by age (e.g. an adult may be in the same stage as a 12 year old in throwing but higher stage in other skills) Copyright © 2015 Republic Polytechnic
Image of page 8

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Stages within SMP (7 14 years old) Copyright © 2015 Republic Polytechnic Usually 7 10 years old Transition Stage Develop interest in games/sports May not develop mature FMS Usually 11 13 years old Application Stage Develop preference over particular games/sports Develop precision and accuracy Usually 14 years old & up Lifelong Utilisation Stage Develop lifetime interest Active participation on competitive or recreational level
Image of page 9
How does one progress through the stages of motor development? Infanthood (<1yr) Information encoding and decoding stage Reflexive movement phase Crawl, sucking, grasp, prone, upright positioning, reaching Anticipation and object control Toddlerhood (1-3yr) Reflex inhibition and pre control stage Rudimentary movement phase Balance, sit walk, run, kick, throw, catch Holding, drawing, writing Early Childhood (3-6yr) Initial, elementary and mature stage Fundamental movement phase Jump, hop, skip, gallop, slide, kick twist, roll Primary School (7-12yr) Transition and Application Stage Specialized movement phase Combination of gross and fine motor skills in discrete, serial or continuous movements Adolescence (13-17yr) Lifelong utilization stage Most FMS would have been established and refined Beginning to take into account “noise” from the environment when performing skill Adulthood (18-65yr) ‘Performance’ stage Developed skills. Perform skill in relation to environmental changes Elderly (>65yr) Regressive stage Disuse atrophy Very Important stage in motor development! Copyright © 2015 Republic Polytechnic
Image of page 10