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The global address and site local address share the

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The global address and site-local address share the same structure beyond the first 48 bits of the address. In global addresses, the SLA ID field identifies the subnet within an organization. For site-local addresses, the Subnet ID field performs the same function. Because of this, you can create a subnetted rout- ing infrastructure that is used for both site-local and global addresses. For example, a specific subnet of your organization can be assigned the global prefix 3FFE:FFFF:4D1C:221A::/64 and the site-local prefix FEC0:0:0: 221A::/64 where the subnet is effectively identified by the SLA ID/Subnet ID value of 221A. While the subnet identifier is the same for both prefixes, routes for both prefixes must still be propagated throughout the routing infrastructure so that addresses based on both prefixes are reachable. Special IPv6 Addresses The following are special IPv6 addresses: Unspecified address The unspecified address (0:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 or ::) is used only to indicate the absence of an address. It is equivalent to the IPv4 unspecified address of 0.0.0.0. The unspecified address is typically used as a source address when a unique address has not yet been determined. The unspecified address is never assigned to an interface or used as a destination address. Loopback address The loopback address (0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1 or ::1) is used to identify a loopback interface, enabling a node to send packets to itself. It is equivalent to the IPv4 loopback address of 127.0.0.1. Packets addressed to the loopback address must never be sent on a link or forwarded by an IPv6 router. 56
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Chapter 3 IPv6 Addressing Compatibility Addresses To aid in the migration from IPv4 to IPv6 and the coexistence of both types of hosts, the following addresses are defined: IPv4-compatible address The IPv4-compatible address, 0:0:0:0:0:0: w.x.y.z or :: w.x.y.z (where w.x.y.z is the dotted decimal representation of a public IPv4 address), is used by IPv6/IPv4 nodes that are communicating with IPv6 over an IPv4 infrastructure that uses public IPv4 addresses, such as the Internet. IPv4-mapped address The IPv4-mapped address, 0:0:0:0:0:FFFF: w.x.y.z or ::FFFF: w.x.y.z , is used to represent an IPv4-only node to an IPv6 node. Windows .NET Server 2003 family and Windows XP IPv6 do not support the use of IPv4-mapped addresses. 6over4 address An address of the type [ 64-bit prefix ]:0:0:WWXX:YYZZ, where WWXX: YYZZ is the colon hexadecimal representation of w.x.y.z (a public or private IPv4 address), is used to represent a host for the tunneling mechanism known as 6over4. 6to4 address An address of the type 2002:WWXX:YYZZ:[ SLA ID ]:[ Interface ID ], where WWXX:YYZZ is the colon hexadecimal representation of w.x.y.z (a public IPv4 address), is used to represent a node for the tunneling mechanism known as 6to4.
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  • Fall '19
  • IP address, Classless Inter-Domain Routing, e-mail addresses

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