mechanical society laws maintain the uniformity of the members of the social

Mechanical society laws maintain the uniformity of

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-mechanical society laws -maintain the uniformity of the members of the social group -repress any deviation from the norms of the rime -organic society laws -regulate the interactions of the various parts of society -provide restitutions in cases of wrongful transactions
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-if law does not provide adequate regulation of interactions of the various parts of society, many  social maladies, including crime can result -modernization is associated with increases in property crime but decreases in violent crime -influenced control theories, neighborhood disorganization theories, and strain theories -Durkheim greatly influenced what is known as the “Chicago School” -Chicago School- several members of the Department of Sociology at the University of Chicago  in the 1940s -instead of focusing on rapid change in entire societies, the Chicago School focused on  rapid change in neighborhoods Robert Park -newspaper writer appointed to the sociology department in 1914 -viewed the city as an organism with parts functioning like in nature (“Human Ecology”) -symbiotic relationships develop within the greater superorganism -found “natural areas” that were organized by ethnicity -found areas organized by income or occupational groups -found areas organized by borders (railroads, highways, rivers, etc.) -each area plays a part in the life of the city as a whole Robert Park and Ernest Burgess studied that organization of cities Shaw and McKay (1930s-40s) -examined juvenile delinquency in Chicago Physical status – the location and condition of the neighborhood -adjacent to heavy industry -condemned buildings -decreasing population Economic status- economic standing of the neighborhood -percentage of families on welfare -median rental cost - Population Composition – the demographics of the neighborhood -high concentration of foreign born and African American heads of households -rates of crime remained relatively the same in zone 2 regardless of demographics, but  people groups with more resources fared better regardless of location
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Shaw concluded that delinquency and other social problems are associated with the process of  invasions, dominance, and succession that determines the concentric growth patterns of the city Kornhauser (1978) -Shaw and McKay’s theory contain two separate arguments -crime emerges in neighborhoods where the relationships and institutions have broken down and  can no longer maintain effective social controls (neighborhood disorganization) -over time, these criminal behaviors come to be supported by the shared values and  neighborhood residents (subculture) -believed that social disorganization is the primary cause of delinquency
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  • Spring '11
  • CHRISHUGGINS
  • Sociology, Criminology, Unemployment, Notes, Lecture Notes, property¬†crime

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