Topic+7+Spacing,+Mating+Ecology

A what is the evidence for food supply 1 ovenbirds

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A. What is the evidence for food supply? 1. Ovenbirds studied by Stenger. Look like chick but it is a warbler, walks and eats on ground Slide. She found this plot when using Berleise funnel Slide to collect insects in leaf litter: 2. Sceloporus fence lizards. Simon found plot like that for the ovenbird just shown. Then she added food (mealworms in dishes) and found a decrease in territory size. Then she took food away and the territory size went back to its old value! No changes in control during this time. So far, so good, but 3. Coral reef fish Eupomacentrus studied by Ebersole. Slide Same experiment of adding food: bits of dead coral with algae on them that the fish like to nibble. Results: i. Males decreased territory size, ii. Females increased territory size. This second was unexpected. Can you explain it, class?
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B. But mating is also important, as in the Jamaican brown lizard ( Anolis lineatopus) studied by Rand 1. This lizard species is sexually dimorphic in size, males reach larger size. Males viciously fight for territories Slide , but all individuals fight sometimes. 2. Patterns of territory defense a. Adult males defend against only other adult males of same species. b. Adult females defend against all individuals of same size: females of same species, males the same size as females (= subadult males) and appropriate individuals of other species. c. Juveniles defend against all individuals of same size regardless of species. 3. Why this pattern? a. Adult males defend territory mainly for mating. The male territory encompasses one or more female territories. His territory is much too large for his food requirements. The bigger the male, and the bigger the territory, the more females contained therein in a related species ( Anolis sagrei ). Bottom line: Only the same species is a mating threat, so only defend against them. b. Adult females, juveniles defend against all food rivals, same or different species. Lizards of the same body size eat the same food sizes.
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Topic 7B. Mating Ecology I. Kinds of mating systems – definitions A. Monogamy – a pair as the system B. Polygamy – more than this 1. polygyny – one male, several females 2. polyandry – one female, several males C. Timing 1. simultaneous – at same time 2. sequential – at different times e.g. sequential polyandry – one male at a time, but not at same time
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  • Fall '08
  • Strong,D
  • Reproduction, Polygyny, males, Polyandry, Mating system

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