3 generalizing do you think the north or the south

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Elementary and Intermediate Algebra
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Chapter 9 / Exercise 71
Elementary and Intermediate Algebra
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3. Generalizing Do you think the North or the South achieved more of its goals in the Compromise of 1850? Why? The Compromise of 1850 • California admitted to the Union as a free state • Popular sovereignty to determine slavery issue in Utah and New Mexico territories • Texas border dispute with New Mexico resolved • Texas receives $10 million • Slave trade, but not slavery itself, abolished in the District of Columbia • New, stringent Fugitive Slave Law adopted
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Elementary and Intermediate Algebra
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Chapter 9 / Exercise 71
Elementary and Intermediate Algebra
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288 Chapter 8 Sectional Conflict Intensifies Three days later, Senator Daniel Webster of Massachusetts rose to respond to Calhoun’s talk of secession. Calling on the Senate to put national unity above sectional loyalties, Webster voiced his support for Clay’s plan, claiming that it was the only hope for preserv- ing the Union. Although he sought concilia- tion, Senator Webster did not back away from speaking bluntly—and with chilling foresight: P RIMARY S OURCE “I wish to speak to-day, not as a Massachusetts man, nor as a Northern man, but as an American. . . . I speak to-day for the preservation of the Union. ‘Hear me for my cause’. . . . There can be no such thing as a peaceable secession. Peaceable secession is an utter impossibility. . . . I see as plainly as I see the sun in heaven what that disrup- tion itself must produce; I see that it must produce war, and such a war as I will not describe.” —from the Congressional Globe The Compromise of 1850 At first, Congress did not pass Clay’s bill, in part because President Taylor opposed it. Then, unexpectedly, Taylor died in office that sum- mer. Vice President Millard Fillmore succeeded him and quickly threw his support behind the compromise. By the end of summer, Calhoun was dead, Webster had accepted the position of secretary of state, and Clay was exhausted, leaving lead- ership of the Senate to younger men. Thirty- seven-year-old Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois took charge of the effort to resolve the crisis. Douglas divided the large compromise initia- tive into several smaller bills. This allowed his colleagues from different sections to abstain or vote against whatever parts they disliked while supporting the rest. By fall, Congress had passed all the parts of the original proposal as Clay had envisioned it, and President Fillmore had signed them into law. Fillmore called the compromise a “final set- tlement” between the North and South. For a short time, the Compromise of 1850 did ease the tensions over slavery. In the next few years, however, more conflicts arose, and the hope of a permanent solution through compromise would begin to fade. Summarizing How did the Gold Rush affect the issue of slavery? The Fugitive Slave Act MAIN Idea Many Northerners opposed the Fugitive Slave Act and vowed to disobey it.

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