The part of piagets theory that plays the biggest

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The part of Piaget's theory that plays the biggest role in education is his stage theory. Piaget believed that cognitive development took place in 4 stages. It is impossible to skip a stage though children might enter and exit stages at different times.
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The first stage is the sensorimotor stage. It begins at birth and extends to about age 2. There are two major characteristics of this stage. One is goal- directed behavior. A behavior is added because an infant stumbled upon it by accident and derived some kind of pleasure from it. They then begin to repeat that behavior. This is also true in other aspects. If a baby is hungry, they are probably going to cry. When they realize that their mother will feed them if they are crying, they are going to repeat that behavior because they know they will get what they want. The second characteristic is object permanence. In infancy, when an object disappears from a child's sight, they believe it is gone forever. That object no longer exists. That is why babies enjoy peek-a-boo so much. But by the age of two, they understand that an object still exists even though they cannot see it. The second stage of development is the preoperational stage. This is from ages 2 to 7. During this time children develop representational thinking. They understand that objects can be substituted with words or numbers or symbols when the real object is not present. This time is also when children learn to talk, read, and count. At this stage, children can begin to solve some problems. However, their thinking is limited by three things: rigidity, centration, and egocentrism. Centration means the child can only focus on one aspect of something (as shown in the Liquid Conservation task) and egocentrism means that the child can only interpret things from their own perspective. The third stage is the concrete operations stage. This is from ages 7 to 11. Thinking in this stage becomes less rigid and they can begin to solve problems logically. They can now classify objects into groups and also put things in a series.
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