Furthermore those captured were expected to display

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Furthermore, those captured were expected to display courage and valor in the face of their sacrifice and the corresponding festival. 9 It was a brutal system but one that rewarded strength, nobility, and honor. To the Tupinamba cannibalism was a communal event, and one to be celebrated, to the Europeans it was an abomination. The Tupinamba drew strength from their practices, and the Europeans savaged them because they felt it was their right, because the Tupinambas' cannibal practices made them monsters in the Europeans' eyes. The final people to be examined come from a small mountain kingdom in western Uganda. The Tooro tribe has lived in this region since ancient times, and even then they were feared as cannibals and dwarfs. Their cannibalistic practices stem from a need to establish continuing dynastic relationships between successive kings. This concept is explained within Heikie Behrend and Arrmin Linke's book, Resurrecting Cannibals, in which they explain that “Access to power was performed as ingestion rather than by occupying a position or a territory. Royal continuity was thus established through the king’s death as sacrifice and the common incorporation of the dead king’s bodily fluids into his successor and other dignitaries.” 10 For the Tooro cannibalism represents the continuing influence and power of long dead kings. One can not even be considered royalty unless they have consumed in some way those that preceded them. Cannibalism therefore becomes integral to their process of succession as opposed to being some savage and unregulated practice. Furthermore, as with some of the other cannibalistic cultures we have seen, there was a 9 Ibid p. 17 10 Heike Behrend, and Armin Linke, Resurrecting Cannibals : the Catholic Church, Witch-hunts, and the production of pagans in Western Uganda , (New York : James Currey, 2011). p.22
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belief that consuming the flesh of the king conferred his spirit to the living realm. For the Tooro this translated to blessings and boons granted by the spirits of kings. This in turn led to the death of a king and his consumption being seen as an extremely honorable event. His death was seen as having meaning through the act of being eaten and benefiting the entire people. 11 This kind of sacrifice is not too far removed from the christian concept of Eucharist and the redemptive suffering of Christ. As Behrend and Linke explain, “As in Eucharist, human sacrifice and a transcendent cannibalistic meal formed part of the kingship rituals and constituted the king’s power.” 12 When placed into this context the cannibalistic practices of the Tooro seem entirely justified. The death of their king is seen as great sacrifice made in the name of his kingdom. He gives his very body and soul for their benefit, there could be no greater gift.
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