Checks and balances of Power The checks and balances system was put into place

Checks and balances of power the checks and balances

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Checks and balances of Power The checks and balances system was put into place to prevent any branch of the government from becoming too powerful. The government is divided into three branches, the legislative, the executive, and the judicial. As each branch exercises their powers, those powers can be checked under the powers given to the other two branches. The head of the executive branch (president) serves as commander in chief of the military forces, but the legislative branch (Congress) assigns funds for the military and votes to declare war. Congress has the power to control the money used to fund any executive decisions. The president nominates federal officials, but the Senate confirms those nominations. Within the legislative branch, both the House of Representatives and the Senate must pass a bill in the same form for it to become law. Once Congress has passed a bill, the president has the power to veto that bill. However, Congress can override a regular presidential veto by a two-thirds vote of both houses.
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Roles and responsibilities of the President The powers of the executive branch were established in 1789 by the founders of the Constitution. Their goal was to create a strong and responsible chief executive. The founders arranged for the president to be elected under a process known as the electoral college. The electoral college is chosen by the people every four years. The chosen members will then cast their votes for president. Per Article II of the US Constitution, the main responsibility of the executive branch is to implement and enforce laws written by Congress. The president is the head of the executive branch but still has many departments and agencies such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Central Intelligence Agency, and the Food and Drug Association within the executive branch to help the president enforce such laws. The president also designates heads of several independent commissions as well as federal judges, ambassadors, and other federal offices. The US
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