secured assurances on getting greater predictability about financial support to

Secured assurances on getting greater predictability

This preview shows page 18 - 21 out of 22 pages.

secured assurances on getting greater predictability about financial support to help them cut emissions, adapt to inevitable changes such as sea level rises and pay for damages that have already happened.
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"The majority of the rulebook for the Paris Agreement has been created, which is something to be thankful for," said Mohamed Adow, a climate policy expert at Christian Aid. "But the fact countries had to be dragged kicking and screaming to the finish line shows that some nations have not woken up to the urgent call of the IPCC report" on the dire consequences of global warming. A central feature of the Paris Agreement — the idea that countries will ratchet up their efforts to fight global warming over time — still needs to be proved effective, he said. "To bend the emissions curve, we now need all countries to deliver these revised plans at the special U.N. Secretary General summit in 2019. It's vital that they do so," Adow said. In the end, a decision on the mechanics of an emissions trading system was postponed to next year's meeting. Countries also agreed to consider the issue of raising ambitions at a U.N. summit in New York next September. Speaking hours before the final gavel, Canada's Environment Minister Catherine McKenna suggested there was no alternative to such meetings if countries want to tackle global problems, especially at a time when multilateral diplomacy is under pressure from nationalism. "The world has changed, the political landscape has changed," she told the Associated Press. "Still you're seeing here that we're able to make progress, we're able to discuss the issues, we're able to come to solutions."
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G. Climate change warning is dire By Chris Mooney and Brady Dennis, Washington Post 10/21/2018 Empty beach chairs rest on the sand as oil washes ashore in Alabama after the Deepwater Horizon Disaster in June 2010. Photo by: Kari Goodnough/Bloomberg The world stands on the brink of failure when it comes to holding global warming to moderate levels, and nations will need to take "unprecedented" actions to cut their carbon emissions over the next decade, according to a landmark report by the globe's top scientific body studying climate change. With global emissions showing few signs of slowing and the United States -- the world's second- largest emitter of carbon dioxide -- rolling back a suite of Obama-era climate measures, the prospects for meeting the most ambitious goals of the 2015 Paris agreement look increasingly slim. To avoid racing past warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) over pre-industrial levels would require a "rapid and far-reaching" transformation of human civilization at a magnitude that has simply never happened before, the group found. "There is no documented historic precedent" for the sweeping change to energy, transportation and other systems required to reach 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC, wrote in a report requested as part of the 2015 Paris climate agreement.
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