2 to what extent do survey recipients already have an

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2. To what extent do survey recipients already have an accurate, ready-made answer for the question? 3. Can people accurately recall and report past behaviors? 4. Is the respondent willing to reveal the requested information? 5. Will respondents feel motivated to answer each question? 6. Is the respondent’s understanding of response categories likely to be influenced by more than words? 7. Is survey information being collected by more than one mode? 8. Is changing a question acceptable to the survey sponsor? Dillman, Chapter 2
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Design Principles 1. Choose simple over specialized words 2. Choose as few words as possible to pose the question 3. Use complete sentences to ask questions 4. Avoid vague quantifiers when more precise estimates can be obtained 5. Avoid specificity that exceeds the respondent’s potential for having an accurate, ready-made answer 6. Use equal numbers of positive and negative categories for scalar questions 7. Distinguish undecided from neutral by placement at the end of the scale Dillman, Chapter 2
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Design Principles 8. Avoid bias from unequal comparisons 9. State both sides of attitude scales in the question stems 10. Eliminate check-all-that-apply question formats to reduce primacy effects 11. Develop response categories that are mutually exclusive 12. Use cognitive design techniques to improve recall 13. Provide appropriate time referents 14. Be sure each question is technically accurate 15. Choose question wordings that allow essential comparisons to be made with previously collected data 16. Avoid asking respondents to say yes in order to mean no Dillman, Chapter 2
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Design Principles 17. Avoid double-barreled questions 18. Soften the impact of potentially objectionable questions 19. Avoid asking respondents to make unnecessary calculations Dillman, Chapter 2
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Survey Implementation Respondent-friendly 4 or more personalized contacts Pre-contact – ask for permission to send Actual – send survey Thank you – after respondent has completed survey Replacement – “in case you didn’t get the one I sent previously…” Final – some feedback after survey is done No cost to submit Personalized correspondence Be professional, look professional Dillman, Chapter 4
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Survey Implementation Understand implications of alternate media In person (guided) In context Telephone Web / online (self managed) Web / online (guided) Tradeoffs in bias and skew
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Survey Implementation Pilot, pilot, pilot! Ordering effects / priming Mode effects (mail/web/phone tree) Cross-cultural survey design Back translation Existing tools (e.g., SurveyMonkey.com, Google Survey Generator)
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Surveys (text) Strengths Most can be answered quickly (if properly designed). Relatively inexpensive. Allow individuals to maintain anonymity. Can be tabulated and analyzed quickly (if properly designed). Weaknesses Response is often low. How to motivate participation?
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  • Fall '08
  • Koru,G
  • Project Management, Requirements analysis, John Walker, requirements gathering

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