The children were separated from their families and encouraged to aban

The children were separated from their families and

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“American” names. The children were separated from their families and encouraged to abandon identities and ties to culturesthe Boarding Schools were modeled after the Carlisle Indian Industrial Schools, which was founded by US Army officer Richard Henry Pratt at a former military installation. In 1892, Pratt explained, “A great general has said that the only good Indian is a dead one. In a sense, I agree with the sentiment, but only in this: that all the Indian there is in the race should be dead. Kill the Indian in him, and save the man.” This Kill the Indian, Save the Man concept became the guideline for these boarding school with assimilation through total immersion.
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-The Dawes Act also known as the General Allotment Act, authorized the president of the US to survey AmericanIndian tribal land and divide it into allotments for individual Indians. Those who accepted allotments and lived separately from their tribe would be granted US citizenship.The objectives of the Dawes Act were to stimulate assimilation of American Indians into mainstream society by imposing the Euro-American model of land ownership and maintenance. This model valued individual ownership of land and subsistence farming over the native value of communal lands. The Dawes Act also provided that any un-allotted be deemed as “excess” for the government to sell on the open market. This allowed purchase and settlement by non-NativeAmericans to obviously make profit but also to further separate tribe membersthe Dawes Act’s goals: oto break up tribes as a social unit, oto encourage individual initiatives over communal, oto further progress of native farmers in Euro-American model, oto reduce cost of native administration, oto secure parts of reservations as Indian lands separate from dominant society, oto open the remainder of land to white settlers for profit.-Manifest Destinyterm manifest destiny, which is the 19th century belief that American settlers were destined, with the God-given right, to expand settlements from coast-to-coast of North America in order for the United States to reach its full potential. This concept is often connected with American Exceptionalism, the idea that Americans were doing what was right for the greater good of the country-AllotmentAmerican Indian tribal land and divide it into allotments for individual Indians. Those who accepted allotments and lived separately from their tribe would be granted US citizenship.a piece of land deeded by the government to a Native American, as part of the division of triballyheld land-Indian Countryany of the many self-governing Native American communities throughout the United States. As alegal category, it includes "all land within the limits of any Indian reservation", "all dependent Indian communities within the borders of the United States", and "all Indian allotments, the Indian titles to which have not been extinguished."[1][2] This legal classification defines American Indian tribal and individual land holdings as part of a reservation, an allotment, or a public domain allotment. All federal trust lands held for Native American tribes is Indian country
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