Analysis Janes arrival at Thornfield is quite a contrast to her first day at

Analysis janes arrival at thornfield is quite a

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AnalysisJane's arrival at Thornfield is quite a contrast to her first day atLowood. Here the house and grounds are very pleasant, andeveryone treats her kindly and with respect. Before Janesleeps in her pleasant room, she prays her thanks for her newsituation and also asks for "the power of meriting the kindnesswhich seemed so frankly offered me before it was earned." Hergratitude and humility reinforce the idea that she has gainedmaturity. The third floor of the manor, however, introduces anelement of gothic mystery to the setting. It feels dark andheavy, and Jane finds it difficult to connect the unearthlylaughter to the person of Grace Poole. "I really did not expectany Grace to answer; for the laugh was as tragic, aspreternatural a laugh as any I ever heard," she comments. Likethe red-room of Jane's childhood, the third floor of Thornfieldseems to lend itself to superstitious fancies.In talking with Jane on her arrival, Mrs. Fairfax comments thatshe looks forward to having someone to talk to. Referring toservants of the house, she says, "Leah is a nice girl to be sure,and John and his wife are very decent people; but then you seethey are only servants, and one can't converse with them onterms of equality: one must keep them at due distance, for fearof losing one's authority." Even within the serving class, thereare ranks and levels, and all must be aware of the socialdifferences between a housekeeper and kitchen help.Jane's direct address to the reader in this chapter is echoed inthe final chapter of the book, which begins with the famous"Reader, I married him." Jane rarely engages in the self-conscious lifting of the authorial curtain; her doing so hereunderscores the significance of this chapter, a passage to anew phase of Jane's life.Chapters 12–13SummaryChapter 12Over the next months, from October to January, Jane settles inat Thornfield. She finds some satisfaction in her daily routinebut feels restless as well. She had hoped for a more excitingenvironment, where she could meet interesting people andhave new experiences.One cold December day, Jane walks to the town of Hay topost a letter. En route she stops to rest and observe "the risingmoon." Suddenly a huge dog and a man on horseback comethundering along the road. The horse slips on ice in the roadand falls, and Jane helps the man, who has injured his ankle.Before he rides off, he questions her briefly, learning that she isthe governess at Thornfield. As Jane walks on, she can't shakethe image of the stranger's face, although it's not a handsomeone. Returning to Thornfield, she notes the moon's progressover the hilltops. Once inside she learns that Mr. Rochester hasreturned home and the surgeon is tending to the ankle hesprained when his horse fell.
Jane Eyre Study GuideChapter Summaries 18Copyright © 2018 Course Hero, Inc.

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