Indicated health literacy rates will continue to

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indicated, health literacy rates will continue to remain low for any patient population without access to relevant resources. Along with consideration of health literacy, providers must also assess patients for their access to electronic resources. Teaching patients about eHealth resources would be useless if the patient did not have any access to the Internet.
12CHANGE THEORY AND eHEALTH LITERACYCheong, Krieger, Miller, & Paige (2018) studied eHealth literacy specifically on the variable of age to assess patient confidence locating, understanding, evaluating, and acting upon online health information. In particular, the study examined the eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) scores and the degree of measurement invariance among U.S. adults representing the following generations: Millennials (18-35-year-olds), Generation X (36-51-year-olds), Baby Boomers (52-70-year-olds), and the Silent Generation (71-84-year-olds). The study by Cheong et al. (2018) found that members of younger generations had a greater awareness of eHealth resources and more confidence in their information seeking and engagement skills on the Internet, as compared to older generations. The researchers here determined that it is critical for health practitioners to be aware of the age-related limitations on health literacy. Healthcare providers should tailor their interventions to fit the generation of their patient. Each generation has a different familiarity level with technology. The older generations will have less familiarity with utilizing technology to expand their health literacy.Krieger, Paige, and Stellefson (2017) reviewed differences between sociodemographic groups to validate each groups’ relationship between eHealth literacy and perceived trust in online health information. Specifically, the researchers reviewed a stratified sample of Black/African Americans (n = 402) and Caucasians (n = 409). Each participant completed a Web based survey that measured eHealth literacy and perceived trustworthiness of online health communication channels and information sources. The study by Krieger et al. (2017) found that eHealth literacy is positively associated with greater perceived trust in health information from online health communication channels and information sources. They also found and that sociodemographic disparities in
13CHANGE THEORY AND eHEALTH LITERACYperceived trust in specific online health communication channels and information sourceswere apparent. This study indicated that practitioners must consider sociodemographic status in determining how to disseminate health information. These considerations are made in order to better promote health literacy.Ramos, I., Ramos, K., Boerner, He, and Tavera-Garcia (2013) reviewed the impact of culturally tailored education to improve the level of health knowledge for thoseof diverse groups. Specifically, a total of 43 Hispanic males who shared deficiencies in community-wide health infrastructure were enrolled in an education program seeking to increase the knowledge base for all participants.

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Term
Spring
Professor
Kenneth Pinaire
Tags
ehealth literacy

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