The practices of racial etiquette are conscious of the formal principles of

The practices of racial etiquette are conscious of

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The practices of racial etiquette are conscious of the formal principles of equality among sovereign states, induce an epistemological silence against any overt statements on racial inequality but stubbornly refuse to give up on the idea of political mastery . Frank Furedi argues that practices of racial etiquette represent a ‘second form of colonization’ that does not have any serious commitment to anti-racism but seeks to indulge in a ‘silent war’ 57
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Orientalism K SDI 3-Week 2016 to ‘produce over time, social formations and even world orders that were macrostructural systems of inclusion and exclusion’ (5). 2 R. Mathur Critical Studies on Security These practices of racial etiquette are further reinforced by contemporary practices of strategic orientalism . Edward Said articulated the concept of ‘Orientalism’ to demonstrate how the West constitutes its own identity on the premise of its differences with others often seen as a source of threat (Said 2001). In these iterative practices of representation the cultural differences are effectively deployed to differentiate the West and discipline the others in the international order. Keith Krause and Andrew Latham suggest that the continued exercise of this disciplinary power necessitates maintenance of military superiority in the post-Cold War period. The West then deploys ‘strategic orientalism’ as a ‘new conceptual template’ that enables the West to impute ‘politicostrategic objectives and purposes’ to Third World countries in a manner that is ‘informed more by Western fears and prejudices than by the realities of politics in these states ’ (Krause and Latham 1998, 38). It transforms ‘essentially contestable interpretations of danger’ into ‘“objective” and incontestable facts regarding the sources of threat and insecurity in the international system’ (38). An effort to map these intersecting practices of racial etiquette, orientalism and strategic orientalism on a continuum reveals practices of sly civility. A grasp of these practices of sly civility facilitates an understanding of the nuclear order with its practices of inclusion and exclusion and the West’s efforts to control the narrative of nuclear arms control and disarmament . In this narrative there is an assumption that the Western practices of arms control and disarmament are ‘rational’, ‘benign’ and provide for the global ‘public good ’ (Krause and Latham 1998, 23). The control of the narrative and its representation of these standards is a prerequisite in the exercise of power over others. Any resistance to this narrative is through practices of racial etiquette and strategic orientalism to be marginalized as peripheral and a source of instability and chaos. These practices of strategic orientalism or sly civility are not sensitive to the ‘ethnocentricity’ of their underlying assumptions and exhibit a ‘distinct matrix of beliefs and dispositions’ towards others in the field of arms control and disarmament (23). It is, therefore, imperative that practices of sly civility be ‘caught in the irredeemable act of writing’ (Bhabha 1994, 133). Homi K. Bhabha suggests
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