It made the structure feel like a continuous extension of its environment

It made the structure feel like a continuous

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the structure feel like a continuous extension of its environment rather than a building that interrupts the nature of the park. Rather that detracting from the beauty of nature, the Palace feeds off it. The distinction between nature, art, and technology is dissolved, and in the Crystal Palace they live in harmony (Schoenefeldt, 2011).Ultimately, the most important aspect of design for the Crystal Palace were the technologies and displays it harbored. The original and sole purpose of the Crystal Palace was to host the Great Exhibition. It’s wide open space was intentional so displays could be littered around the site, and the massive number of aristocrats and wealthy patrons that would visit the Palace could comb through and see the new technologies the industrial revolution had provided them. Although the Crystal Palace has come to be remembered more than the Great Exhibition itself, the items held within the Palace say a lot about its purpose and Britain’s self-image at the time. It was obvious that the British chose to showcase their talents in a way that almost demeaned the importance of all the other countries’ displays. The was a sense of “otherness” when it came to the displays of foreign countries, always second to that of Britain’s. It seemed to be the manifestation of western imperialism, as a hierarchy was clearly established by Britain in
Nunez 8Britain’s favor (Jones, 2011). However, Britain’s attempt backfired as handcrafted, artisanal goods from India were preferred over Britain’s goods that were manufactured in excess. This added to the discussion of whether or not the Crystal Palace was a grand work of architecture, as it was seen as a product of Britain’s excess (James-Chakraborty, 2014).
Nunez 9Works CitedJames-Chakraborty, Kathleen. “The Industrial Revolution.”Architecture since 1400, University of Minnesota Press, 2014, pp. 255–272.JSTOR, . JONES, PAUL. “Modernity and Mega-Events: Architecturing a Future.”The Sociology of Architecture: Constructing Identities, 1st ed., Liverpool University Press, 2011, pp. 67–91.JSTOR, . SCHOENEFELDT, HENRIK. “Adapting Glasshouses for Human Use: Environmental Experimentation in Paxton's Designs for the 1851 Great Exhibition Building and the Crystal Palace, Sydenham.”Architectural History, vol. 54, 2011, pp. 233–273.JSTOR, . Bhatt, Ritu. “The Significance of the Aesthetic in Postmodern Architectural Theory.”Journal of Architectural Education (1984-), vol. 53, no. 4, 2000, pp. 229–238.JSTOR, . ROY, ANANYA. “Traditions of the Modern: A Corrupt View.”Traditional Dwellings and Settlements Review, vol. 12, no. 2, 2001, pp. 7–19.JSTOR, . Lieberman, Ralph. “THE CRYSTAL PALACE: A LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY VIEW OF ITS CHANGING PLACE IN ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY AND CRITICISM.”AA Files, no. 12, 1986, pp. 46–58.JSTOR, .
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