In 19601961 the residential campus countries provided

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In 1960/1961, the residential campus countries provided 66.5 per cent of total enrolment and by the time of the preparation of the University's first development plan in 1988/1989 the campuses provided 93.4 per cent (Brandon 1999, 125). Today, the trend prevails with almost 90 per cent of total enrolment dominated by nationals of the residential campus territories. Over the ten year period, 2000/2001 to 2009/2010, the university increased its output of graduates by 60 per cent. For the academic year, 2009/2010, the university produced over 9,152 gradu- ates and by 2013, the total number of graduates was 10,158, an increase of 11 per cent be- tween 2009 and 2013. The UWI is funded in part by the governments of seventeen (17) countries (Campus and Open Campus countries see Box 1.2), tuition fees, investment of assets, fundraising of various kinds and philanthropic giving (Roberts 2011, 3). Generally, arrangements for payment of tuition fees vary among governments. The governments of the contributing territories sponsor their stu- dents by paying 80 per cent of the economic cost while students from contributing countries, not sponsored by their governments but who are admitted under the quota, pay 33.3 per cent of the economic cost. Curriculum reform has enabled undergraduate and postgraduate programmes to respond to national needs and regional imperatives while at the same being influenced by global trends and standards. Significant advances in technology have been made thus, enriching the learning experience of students in the classroom and moving the university into the 21st century. Over the years, universities have evolved their roles into a broader mission that better support the social and economic development of their societies. The aim is to contribute to the ‘public good’ of the communities, countries and region. As such, research and development a ctivities at universities have become much more important. To that end, the UWI seeks to enhance its research profile in knowledge creation as well as knowledge application in the social, financial, cultural or scientific/natural environment fields relevant to national and regional needs. This can be seen as an extension of its traditional strengths in areas such as biotechnology, infor- mation technology, tropical medicine and non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The UWI has also committed to expanding research initiatives in health economics and health issues arising from certain chronic diseases as well as renewable energy, climate change and food security. There have been thoughtful attempts to link research and innovation by placing emphasis on entrepreneurship, competitiveness and diversification strategies. Further, the University through its research initiatives has been able to impact national and regional policy-making and BOX 1.2: CAMPUS CONTRIBUTING COUNTRIES •Anguilla • Antigua & Barbuda • The Bahamas • Barbados • Belize • Bermuda • British Virgin Islands • Cayman Islands • Dominica • Grenada • Jamaica • Montserrat • St. Kitts & Nevis • St. Lucia • St. Vincent & the Grenadines • Trinidad & Tobago • Turks and Caicos Islands

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