Topic 1 section b page 13 1c monitor risk controls

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Topic 1 -> Section B -> Page 13 1C Monitor risk controls and hazard-specific procedures to support legislative and regulatory compliance The community services environment is always changing. Legislation, work systems, processes, technology, equipment, machinery and tools are constantly changing and being updated. Therefore, regular review of the hazard identification, risk assessment and control procedures is necessary to comply with WHS legislation and regulatory requirements. Monitoring controls and hazard-specific procedures enables early identification of new
hazards and ensures that controls are maintained or adjusted in a timely manner to effectively manage workplace risk. Topic 1 -> Section C -> Page 1 Monitor risk control and hazard-specific procedures Maintaining records is an essential aspect of monitoring risk control and hazard-specific procedures. Without any documentation it is very difficult to accurately measure how well a procedure is meeting the needs of the people it is designed to support. Having a written account of the risk management process demonstrates how hazards were identified and the decision-making processes involved. A written account also provides information about which controls were chosen and the intended result. This information can also be used to identify any deviations from the procedure. By using written accounts alongside incident and injury data an assessment can be made on whether or not the WHS procedures are effective and the controls are effectively managing risk. Documented risk management processes can also be used as tools to minimise risk. By documenting common workplace hazards such as hazardous chemicals, alongside the controls that are needed to manage the risk, the document can then be turned into an action plan that everyone can refer to and follow to minimise the risk associated with those hazards. Common workplace hazards include: manual tasks gravity electricity equipment and machinery hazardous chemicals extreme temperatures noise radiation biological hazards psychosocial hazards. Topic 1 -> Section C -> Page 2 Monitor procedures for compliance with legislative and regulatory requirements All WHS-related procedures should accurately reflect current WHS legislation as well as the recommendations outlined in the associated code of practice and industry guidelines. It is important that all procedures are regularly updated to reflect any change of practice and ensure consistency with the legislation and regulatory requirements. All WHS procedures should also be able to be consistently applied across all areas of the workplace. For example, some areas of infection control may require specific processes; however, your procedure should contain a risk-management framework that enables the basic principles of infection prevention and control, such as hand hygiene, to be applied to a wide range of community services settings.

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