Commitment four kinds of identity status identity

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Commitment ? Four kinds of identity status: Identity diffusion (no search; no commitment) Foreclosure (no search; commitment) Moratorium (search; no commitment) Identity achievement (search; commitment) Developmental course of identity development . . . foreclosure moratorium achievement diffusion Does identity development end in adolescence?
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1/31/13 9 Correlates of identity status . . . foreclosed diffused moratorium achieved relations w/parents respectful withdrawn affectionate affectionate self-esteem low low high high ethnic identity strong medium medium strong dependency high medium medium low Development of gender identity By age 2, children can identify themselves and others correctly by sex, and begin to play in gender-typed (and stereotyped) ways By age 5, children understand that their sex is unchanging (prior to this, they believe that sex is based on appearance and behavior), and their behavior becomes more gender- typed One reason is that children begin acquiring gender schemas (organized beliefs and expectations about boys and girls) that guide their thinking about themselves and steer their behavior into gender-typed activities. Young children increasingly seek further information about their gender. Development of gender identity In middle childhood, children continue to self-segregate in sex-specific groups that develop their own social interaction styles, communication patterns, and forms of intimacy In adolescence, self-segregation diminishes as gender identity intensifies and gender norms become even more influential
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1/31/13 10 Influences on the development of gender identity parental modeling and instruction peer influences children ³ s conceptual growth and understanding (self-socialization) cultural values and beliefs about gender, conveyed in many ways (including media) Are sex differences in behavior important? Sex di ff erences can be found in: verbal ability? visual-spatial ability? aggression? activity level? developmental vulnerability? self-esteem? sociability? compliance? analytic ability? Are sex differences in behavior important?
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