Whoever accepted those kits should have communicated that the inventory needed

Whoever accepted those kits should have communicated

This preview shows page 15 - 19 out of 19 pages.

Whoever accepted those kits should have communicated that the inventory needed to be completed.
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FINAL PROJECT ONE 16 Communication was lacking between Nurse Vicki and Nurse Feldmeyer to Dr. Ricketson. Had they communicated their concerns at the start of the surgery they may have stopped Dr. Ricketson from continuing with the surgery or stopped him form implanting the screwdriver shaft. Further communication should have occurred between the nurses, Dr. Ricketson and the patient post-surgery. Had they all communicated that a makeshift rod had been implanted Arturo may have not fell and had his health decline. The nurses also were aware that Arturo did not speak English and should have communicated that Arturo may not have understood the consent or the risks involved with his surgery. The HMC supervisor should have communicated with Dr. Ricketson about ethical concerns, policies and procedure being broken, consents not being signed, screwdriver shaft not approved for implantation, lack of communication with the patient, Arturo may have not died. The supervisor should have also spoken to his supervisor about these concerns to avoid this malpractice claim. All of these preventative strategies will avoid liability claims in the future and should be implemented. These strategies when implemented provide safe, quality healthcare experience for the patient and ensure that healthcare providers avoid liability claims.
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FINAL PROJECT ONE 17 References American Medical Association, (2001). AMA code of Medical Ethics, Retrieved from - medical-ethics.pdf Blumenthal-Barby, J. S., & Lo, B. (2019). Building on the American College of Physicians Ethics Manual. Annals of internal medicine , 170 (2), 133-134. Cassel CK, Holmboe ES. Credentialing and Public Accountability: A Central Role for Board Certification. JAMA. 2006;295(8):939–940. doi:10.1001/jama.295.8.939 Dallon, C. W. (2000). Understanding judicial review of hospitals' physician credentialing and peer review decisions. Temp. L. Rev. , 73 , 597. Fremgen, B. F. (2016). Medical Law and Ethics (5th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson Danzon, P. (2000). Liability of Medical Malpractice. Handbook of Health Economics, 1, 1339-1404. Elwyn, G., Frosch, D., Thomson, R., Joseph-Williams, N., Lloyd, A., Kinnersley, P. Barry, M. (2012). Shared decision making: A model for clinical practice. Journal of General Internal Medicine , 27(10), 1361–1367. doi: - 012-2077-6 Ethical Guidelines. (n.d.). In Alleydog.com online glossary. Retrieved from: Kearney-Nunnery, R. (2016 ). Advancing your career: Concepts of professional nursing (6th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: FA Davis.
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FINAL PROJECT ONE 18 Leonard, J. (2018). Find law’s Intermediate Court of Appeals of Hawaii case and opinions. Retrieved from - appeals/1597588.html Parson, W. (2018). Wayne Parsons Law Office, 2018. Retrieved from Mandal, J., Ponnambath, D., Parija, S. (2016). Utilitarian and deontological ethics in medicine. Tropical Parasitology, 6 (1), 5-7.
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  • Fall '18
  • Ethics, Physician, Arturo, Dr. Robert Ricketson

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