As the historical events they were a part of which

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as the historical events they were a part of, which had meaning for later generations. Although the ancient world may seem remote in time and place, a look at some of its key developments shows just how important it was in the birth of the humanities, as it introduced reasons for creating artifacts that would continue through later periods and raised for the first time ideas that still occupy us today. Shabti Dolls: The Workforce in the Afterlife - The Egyptians believed the afterlife was a mirror-image of life on earth. When a person died their individual journey did not end but was merely translated from the earthly plane to the eternal. The soul stood in judgement in the Hall of Truth before the great god Osiris and the Forty-Two Judges and, in the weighing of the heart, if one's life on earth was found worthy, that soul passed on to the paradise of the Field of Reeds . The soul was rowed with others who had also been justified across Lily Lake (also known as The Lake of Flowers) to a land where one regained all which had been thought lost. There one would find one's home, just as one had left it, and
any loved ones who had passed on earlier. Every detail one enjoyed during one's earthly travel, right down to one's favorite tree or most loved pet, would greet the soul upon arrival. There was food and beer , gatherings with friends and family, and one could pursue whatever hobbies one had enjoyed in life. Work in the Afterlife - In keeping with this concept of the mirror-image, there was also work in the afterlife. The ancient Egyptians were very industrious and one's work was highly valued by the community. People, naturally, held jobs to support themselves and their family but also worked for the community. Community service was compulsory in `giving back' to the society which provided one with everything. The religious and cultural value of ma'at (harmony) dictated that one should think of others as highly as one's self and everyone should contribute to the benefit of the whole. - The great building projects of the kings, such as the pyramids , were constructed by skilled craftsmen, not slaves, who were either paid for their skills or volunteered their time for the greater good. If, whether from sickness, personal obligation or simply lack of desire to comply, one could not fulfill this obligation, one could send someone else to work in one’s place - but could only do so once. On earth, one's place was filled by a friend, relative, or a person one paid to take one's place; in the afterlife, however, one's place was taken by a shabti doll. The Function of the Shabti - Shabti dolls (also known as shawbti and ushabti ) were funerary figures in ancient Egypt who accompanied the deceased to the after-life. Their name is derived
from the Egyptian swb for stick but also corresponds to the word for `answer’ ( wsb ) and so the shabtis were known as `The Answerers’. - The figures, shaped as adult male or female mummies, appear in tombs early on (when they represented the deceased) and, by the time of the New Kingdom

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