While section 223 may be a little abstract and difficult to understand because

While section 223 may be a little abstract and

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examples, you should be able to grasp the ideas behind the patterns. Things should become clearer onceyou read Section 2.6 which explains in detail how resource assignment is done in YAWL. Here, theorganizational model is described (i.e. what are roles, positions, capabilities, etc.), the life-cycle of awork item from its creation to completion is described, along with all the actions that the user can do toa work item. You should have a good understanding of Figure 2.34, as the work item life-cycle is oneof the central concepts in workflow management. The interaction strategiesin Section 2.6.3 deal withhow a work item gets to be worked on by a particular resource (person). The distinction betweenoffering, allocating, and starting of a work item is important. Each of these three actions can be doneeither by the workflow system, or by a resource (person). The routing strategies in Section 2.6.4 dealwith how possible resources for a task or work item are selected. You will see that this can be donebased on roles, capabilities, and other criteria. Additional constraints can be imposed on the resources,such as the need to have a different person do a certain task, or the requirement to have the same persondo different tasks. Finally, Section 2.6.5 gives a quick overview over the rights or privileges that usershave with respect to what they are allowed to do with workflow items that have been allocated to them.Chapter 10Now that you have an understanding of the different resource patterns and the routing and interactionstrategies supported by YAWL, you will want to know how to actually use the YAWL software toimplement them. This happens in two parts. In the YAWL control center web application, you can loginto the YAWL resource service to define the organizational structure, i.e. the roles, positions, users,etc. Once all this is defined, you can then assign resources to tasks in the YAWL editor. Chapter 10describes the resource service where you define the organizational model. You should read the entirechapter except Section 10.4.If you have understood the principles of resource allocation and routing in Chapter 2 (Section 2.6), youwill find that many of the sections in Chapter 10 are repetition with a bit of added detail. Section 10.2provides another view over the interaction strategies in YAWL and Section 10.3 is again anintroduction to the way that organizations are modelled in YAWL, this time with an example of what itlooks like in the software. As I mentioned already, you will need to log as into the YAWL as anadministrator. YAWL login screen
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The first time, you can use the default user “admin” with password “YAWL”. As part of defining usersand participants, you can create other users with administrator privileges (see Section 10.6 for details).
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