4 Critical friend training The training of Critical Friendship partnerships in

4 critical friend training the training of critical

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4. Critical friend training - The training of Critical Friendship partnerships in one of the networks was designed to help teachers learn from observing each others’ classroom practices more effectively. Critical Friendship work seemed to resonate strongly with many staff and has produced some tangible changes ion how colleagues go about their daily work. 5. The inclusion project - Within one of the networks, the development of an Inclusion Project served to benefit of schools and all who work with young people. The network originally had a special needs unit which was used by very few pupils as there were problems relating to transporting pupils to and forum the unit. Rather than continue with the unit which was of benefit to very few pupils, schools within the NLC decided to pool the resources relating to the special needs unit and develop a role of Inclusion Project manager and a supporting TA. The Inclusion Project manager and TA now go into schools to help children with special needs, this has resulted in so help for special needs pupils being extended from a minority to a much larger number of pupils Appendix 3 DfES report Factors Influencing the Transfer of Good Practice (Fielding et al 2004) Modes of learning and activities a)Experiential learning -the partner is directly involved with the practice being transferred from a more experienced person. For example through: Co-teaching Teachers work alongside one another in the classroom context. Lesson Observations These could be observations of modelled lessons for partners to develop a practical understanding of good practice or observation of lessons to suggest next steps in practice development. 26
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Joint planning These aspects attend to planning and assessment, important aspects of teachers’ practice outside of the classroom. Practical workshops We came across examples in contexts e.g. drama and thinking skills, where the approach of the originator was to ask teachers to participate in the activities they offered as good practice. Here teachers’ practical involvement led to the development of new practices in their classroom. b) Reflective Learning -the practice is addressed, but the partner does not directly experience the practice. For example: Meeting to discuss shared problems or issues for development. E.g. “we’re trying to develop this aspect of our wok, what do you do in your school?” Seminars, theory / idea based CPD training and education Such activities were normally a combination of ideas or theories underlying good practice and practical examples of how these ideas can be used in the classroom. Discussing good practice with other teachers In formal situations (e.g. shared CPD) ‘carousel’ type arrangements allowed teachers to tell one another about aspects of their classroom practice they feel positive about.
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