As a social worker to express you have cultural competence Kirst Ashman and

As a social worker to express you have cultural

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As a social worker to express you have cultural competence, Kirst-Ashman and Hull (2018) explain that social workers must remain respectful to the different cultural norms and morals of the broad cultural groups (pg.469). A skill that can be utilized in practice would be skilled listening. Forrester, Westlake, and Glynn (2012) explain that social workers who use skilled listening demonstrate an aura of empathy and regard for their clients' and their clients felt more comfortable opening up and not opposing the social worker's help. In the case of Eboni, the 16-year-old honor student who is now expecting her first child, skill listening would prove to be an ideal skill to have and utilize in a family setting. As the case with Eboni progressed, we found that her mother was against her pregnancy and opted for abortion, which caused conflict with Eboni and her other family members being her Father and Grandmother. With this comes the skill of conflict resolution. Kirst-Ashman and Hull (2018) describe the conflict as a regular part of group relations, and in the case of Eboni and her family, these conflicts come in the form of clashing beliefs. The role of the social worker in Eboni's case would be to listen and understand her perspective and to be a mediator to help strengthen Eboni's relationship with her family. References Donald Forrester, D. W. (2012). Parental resistance and social worker skills: towards atheory of motivational social work. Park Square Campus, Luton: University of Bedfordshire. Karen K. Kirst-Ashman and Grafton H. Hull, J. (2018). Empowerment Series Understanding Generalist Practice. Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.
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