Is the book the sum total of the ink marks on those

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Is the book the sum total of the ink marks on those pages? Is the book the story those pages tell? Say we go with the third option and think about a book, e.g., The Catcher in the Rye, as a (relatively) self-contained story, involving several characters interacting with one another over some period of time. That whole story has been encoded in some language and stored somewhere in such a way that it can be read electronically on a number of devices orprinted out onto pieces of paper with ink on them that are all bound together. (You may have one of these arcane bound volumes of paper
lying around—if you do, and it has ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ written on the cover, it is likely one of the millions of particular devices through which The Catcher in the Ryecan be delivered.) Reading the story involves going through each ‘page’ or page of the text. As you do this, the details emerge for you, the reader. Those details were already a part of the story—which existed as a completed work before you began reading—but they are revealed to you sequentially as you follow the narrative. You increase your understanding of the story with each page that you read (and with each time that you read through the whole text), but the story is not made up of a bunch of words that just happened to be assembled in that particular way. Each word that you encounter as you read is already a part of an interrelated whole of words that have been chosen to tell that story. The parts on this page and on that page and on those pages are parts of the same bookonly because each is produced to play one particular role within the telling of the story. If we think about our lives as being analogous to stories, we can think about our particular actions and interactions as the various ways in which that story unfolds. Our character is who we really areover the course of that life, regardless of how we may appear to beat any given moment during any given act. It is what binds all of our particular desires and particular actions together in a coherent story of a life that is lived either well (virtuously) or poorly (viciously). Without our character, there would be no coherent structure or intelligibility for the decisions we make and the actions we take. There would be no metric for determining whether the life we lead is a good or a bad example of a human life. Particular decisions and particular actions would have no moral value (good or bad), if they were not related to one
another in coherent ways within a story that includes overarching desires and habitual means for attaining what we are after. It is no coincidence that the people who appear in the stories we read are called characters. A Model of Human Action Process Consider a very basic and very general view of human action: Identify a good: We represent something that can be achieved through our action as being good, in some way or another.

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