Reflect on whether treatments for one disorder would work for the other

Reflect on whether treatments for one disorder would

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Reflect on whether treatments for one disorder would work for the other disorder. Select one of the following patient factors: genetics, gender, ethnicity, age, or behavior. Reflect on how the factor you selected might impact the pathophysiology of and treatments for each disorder. By Day 3 Post an explanation of the pathophysiological mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disorder and irritable bowel syndrome, including similarities and differences. Then describe common treatments, addressing whether treatments for one disorder would work for the other disorder. Finally, explain how the patient factor you selected might impact the pathophysiology of and treatments for each disorder. Read a selection of your colleagues’ responses.
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WEEKLY DISCUSSIONS 4 INITIAL POST NURS 6501N-38 Week Eight Discussion Digestive Disorders The digestive system takes ingested food, breaks it down into nutrients for cellular uptake, absorbs fluid and eliminates wastes. Occurring in a process called, digestion. Except for swallowing and defecation, the autonomic nervous system controls the digestion process. The digestive system includes the gastrointestinal tract (esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and rectum) and accessory organs of digestion: the salivary glands, liver, gallbladder, and exocrine pancreas (Huether, & McCance, 2017). Digestive disorders can disrupt any part of the digestive process causing the digestion process to become slowed, obstructed, or accelerated. Many gastrointestinal (GI) clinical manifestations are nonspecific and can cause a variety of impairments (Huether, & McCance, 2017, p. 906). Two distinct gastrointestinal disorders, Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) cause confusion because they can produce similar symptoms. However, they need very different treatments. Therefore, it is essential as an advanced practice nurse; one can accurately diagnose the disease process. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an autoimmune process characterized by chronic inflammation of all or sections the small intestine, colon or both, and is differentiated into Crohn disease (CD) or Ulcerative Colitis (UC), with periods of exacerbations and remission (Hammer, & McPhee, 2014). Inflammation in IBD is due to the altering of the barrier function of the mucosal epithelium (Huether, & McCance, 2017). Mucosal impairment causes the loss of immune tolerance to normal intestinal antigens triggering T cell activation. T cell activation
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WEEKLY DISCUSSIONS 5 induces proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor and interleukins to cause inflammation and damage the intestinal epithelium (Huether, & McCance, 2017). IBD presents itself with skip lesions or patchy areas of transmural inflammation in the ileocecal area, colon, and perianal inflammation can be present (Hammer, & McPhee, 2014). IBD signs and symptoms include GI upset, abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, rectal bleeding, and malabsorption (Hammer, & McPhee, 2014). UC presents itself as a continuous lesion of superficial inflammation and pseudopolyps from the distal colon to the proximal colon. The lesion starts at
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  • Fall '17
  • keisha lovence

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