Complexity the more complex the antigen the bigger

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Complexity --The more complex the antigen the bigger the specific response. Foreign --The more foreign the antigen the bigger the specific response. The ability to be processed —usually a phagocytic process to mount a specific response. Can’t mount a specific response to joint or valve replacement but can mount a specific response to organ transplant Route of Administration —must be administered in the right place to get immune response. Dosage —to little of a dose the body won’t respond. The specific response won’t touch it and let’s the non specific respond. To much of a dose overwhelms the specific response. ***All factors must be occurring to mount a specific immune response**** Antibody Production 1. Differentiate between natural, passive, artificial, adoptive immunity Natural artificial Immunity— Vaccine Natural active immunity— own body fights antigen Passive active Immunity— mom to baby Passive artificial Immunity— get immunoglobulins (give gammaglobulins to fight hepatitis of no vaccine and been exposed to it. Also Brutton’s disease will get gammaglobulins through IV) Adoptive Immunity— bone marrow transplant. Giving patient an immune system from someone else.
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2. List three major lymphoid organs and discuss the function of each. Primary --Bone Marrow—the largest tissue in the body, located in the long bones. Its role is the generation of hematopoietic cells. --Thymus—a small, flat, bilobed organ found in the thorax of humans, which serves as the site for differentiation of T cells. Secondary --Spleen—largest secondary lymphoid organ in the body located in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen. It functions to filter out old cells and foreign antigens. --Lymph node—secondary lymphoid organ that is located along lymphatic duct and filters lymphatic fluid from the tissues and act as a site of processing of foreign antigen. --MALT (mucosal associated lymphoid tissue) found in the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and urogenital tracts. Macrophages and lymphocytes are localized at some the main ports of entry for foreign organisms. 3. Define Humoral immunity— antibodies. Anything found in body humors (anything liquid ex. Malt and Galt) Cellular immunity— leads to humoral immunity. Some cells have the ability to destroy or kill other cells. ***Types*** T-killer cells Null cells (NK cells) large lymphocytes with granules T Helper cells- help B cells to mount an immune response. (HIV Virus kills T helper cells, so B Cell can’t go to a plasma cell to form antibody. T helper cells with CD4 marker are destroyed by HIV virus) 4. Diagram the primary and secondary immune responses
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5. Compare and contrast the primary and secondary humoral responses. Primary response— first exposed Secondary response—( AKA – anamnestic, memory, or secondary) faster and lasts longer. Higher concentration, both antibodies are produced.) 6. Explain why there is a difference between primary and secondary humoral responses.
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