When the counsellor restates the clients problem the client is thereby

When the counsellor restates the clients problem the

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When the counsellor restates the client’s problem, the client is thereby reassured of the counsellor’s attent iveness and ability to follow with the client’s explanation. According to Adedipe (1997), he opines that, although it is important for the counsellor to maintain a listening role, there are certain kinds of responses which communicate not only that, the counsellor is listening, but also that the counsellor is a person with an active role. The restatement is one of these responses. An example is the following interaction: Client: “I don’t know whether to stay in school or to drop out and get a job but if I do, I don’t kn ow what kind of job I can f ind” Counsellor: “You are wandering whether to stay in school or to drop out and work; Assuring: Assuring as a counselling technique, demands that a counsellor makes a conscious effort to gain the client ’s confidence in the process of assisting him to solve his (cl ient’ s) problem. The counsellor exhibits a personal quality, which makes the client to trust and rely on the counsellor as a worthy provider of assistance that can solve his problem. Silence: This technique involves sudden cessation or suspension of sound by both the counsellor and the client temporarily. It is important for the counsellor to know the appropriate time and way of using silence if not it can be mistaken for his inability of knowing what to say. In case the counsellor does not know a lot to say when silence is applied, he could make statements such as:
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80 You must be deeply touched by your problems. Are you thinking of a better way to state your problems? You are not sure; you should discuss certain aspect of your problem with me. These statements will enable the client to know that you are still in the process of helping him to follow through his problem. Self-disclosure: This technique refers to the act of making known som eone’s feelings/reactions or uncovering som eone’s feelings or reactions to situations or persons. Such feelings are of course secret until they are made known. A counsellor who uses self-disclosure will definitely make known his feelings and reactions to his c lient’s presentations. It is, however, important to note that such feelings that are made known must be genuine, sincere and authentic. The use of self-disclosure also demands that the counsellor must have understood his client and in fact gained his confidence in their interpersonal relationship. This is because if the counsellor disclosed his genuine feelings upon first contact with client, the client may withdraw from counselling session. But if he understands the client, and the client has developed trust in him, then self-disclosure will serve its functions in helping the client to develop: (a) develop appropriate honest behaviour; (b) Complete counselling relationship.
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