Substantial areas of king island have been cleared

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Substantial areas of King Island have been cleared for agricultural purposes and artificially drained since European settlement, primarily for the production of dairy cattle. The net result has been the loss and fragmentation of a large proportion of the original foraging habitat for Neophema chrysogaster on the island. While rates of clearing of native vegetation on King Island have now declined, there is still the potential for loss or degradation of the remaining un- reserved salt marsh foraging habitat and adjacent roosting habitat. Recovery Actions specific to King Island Provide information and extension support to the King Island Natural Resource Management committee, King Island council, Government agencies and the local community on the location, significance and management of known and potential habitat; Revegetate sites with inadequate roosting habitat; Erect stock-exclusion fences to protect foraging and roosting habitat where appropriate; Promote and establish covenants or other management agreements with stakeholders to ensure the long-term protection of key sites on private land; Continue annual monitoring of Neophema chrysogaster on King Island to assess use of key sites and effectiveness of conservation management actions. King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 170
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Sternula albifrons sinensis (Little Tern) Description Sternula albifrons sinensis is a small tern which can be difficult to distinguish from the very similar fairy tern Sternula nereis nereis . In the breeding season, adult Sternula albifrons sinensis have a black cap and tapering loral stripe, giving a distinctive triangular white patch on the forehead (Plate 14; lacking in the fairy tern). The rest of the head and neck are white, the upperparts are pale grey, with a contrastingly white rump, uppertail-coverts and tail. There is a white line along the upper edge, and a thin black line along the bottom edge, of the folded primaries, and the outer primaries are a slightly darker grey. The underparts are wholly white. The bill is bright yellow with a small black tip, the eyes blackish, and the legs and feet bright orange. In non-breeding adults, the forehead, forecrown and anterior lores become white-washed with grey, leaving a dark band extending from in front of the eyes to the nape that merges into dark spotting on the rear-crown. Non-breeding birds also have a pale-grey rump, uppertail-coverts and tail, a black bill, and the legs and feet are a duller, orange-brown. Juveniles resemble non-breeding adults but the black band on the head is narrower and duller; the white forehead, anterior lores and crown are washed brown, the bill is dark brown with a darker blackish tip and base, and the legs and feet are brownish orange.
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  • Fall '14
  • The Hours, ........., Threatened species, Bass Strait, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, King Island

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