4114 enterprise environmental factors described in

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4.1.1.4 Enterprise Environmental Factors Described in Section 2.1.5. The enterprise environmental factors that can influence the Develop Project Charter process include, but are not limited to: Governmental standards, industry standards, or regulations (e.g. codes of conduct, quality standards, or worker protection standards), Organizational culture and structure, and Marketplace conditions. 4.1.1.5 Organizational Process Assets Described in Section 2.1.4. The organizational process assets that can influence the Develop Project Charter process include, but are not limited to: Organizational standard processes, policies, and process definitions, Templates (e.g., project charter template), and Historical information and lessons learned knowledge base (e.g., projects, records, and documents; all project closure information and documentation; information about both the results of previous project selection decisions and previous project performance information; and information from the risk management activity).
71 ©2013 Project Management Institute. A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK ® Guide) – Fifth Edition 4 - PROJECT INTEGRATION MANAGEMENT 4 4.1.2 Develop Project Charter: Tools and Techniques 4.1.2.1 Expert Judgment Expert judgment is often used to assess the inputs used to develop the project charter. Expert judgment is applied to all technical and management details during this process. Such expertise is provided by any group or individual with specialized knowledge or training and is available from many sources, including: Other units within the organization, Consultants, Stakeholders, including customers or sponsors, Professional and technical associations, Industry groups, Subject matter experts (SME), and Project management office (PMO). 4.1.2.2 Facilitation Techniques Facilitation techniques have broad application within project management processes and guide the development of the project charter. Brainstorming, conflict resolution, problem solving, and meeting management are examples of key techniques used by facilitators to help teams and individuals accomplish project activities. 4.1.3 Develop Project Charter: Outputs 4.1.3.1 Project Charter The project charter is the document issued by the project initiator or sponsor that formally authorizes the existence of a project and provides the project manager with the authority to apply organizational resources to project activities. It documents the business needs, assumptions, constraints, the understanding of the customer’s needs and high-level requirements, and the new product, service, or result that it is intended to satisfy, such as:
72 ©2013 Project Management Institute. A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK ® Guide) – Fifth Edition 4 - PROJECT INTEGRATION MANAGEMENT Project purpose or justification, Measurable project objectives and related success criteria, High-level requirements, Assumptions and constraints, High-level project description and boundaries, High-level risks, Summary milestone schedule, Summary budget,

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