According to recent reports the most notable problems

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According to recent reports, the most notable problems school systems are experiencing are major splits in proficiency levels based on the wealth status of students in schools and racial splits in achievement levels. There are numerous complaints with factors of motivation and support in the school system as well.
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In every school district there are high-income and low-income schools. A recent analysis of adequate yearly progress reports or AYP’s by Sarah McCartney, a professor from the University of Illinois, shows that there is a major split in the passing and failing of AYP’s based on the level of wealth of a school (McCartney 462). When Sarah McCartney interviewed teachers from high as well as low-income schools, she found that teachers in high- income schools feel little to no pressure from the NCLB act’s system, because their students are well prepared and successful enough to meet and surpass the standardized tests, while teachers in low-income schools are constantly feeling hopeless that their students will make any real achievements. The issue here is on the school districts. School districts constantly brag about their successful schools, but little is heard about how these districts are trying to improve the poor unsuccessful schools they are in charge of. Instead of trying to reform the NCLB system, school districts need to take note on what makes these high-income schools so successful, and apply these methods to the low-income schools. A report done by Harold Nelson, an executive director for secondary schools in Sarasota Florida, did just this. Mr. Nelson studied successful schools, and came up with a ten-point
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guideline that could be applied to low-income schools. Some of the included points were creating understandable school missions, forming strong teacher parent relationships, and developing an accurate monitoring system for student success (Nelson 57-66). In other words what schools need to implement is a system that monitors and challenges students to be
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