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Afterward the electron a remains at rest at b b moves

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Afterward the electron: A) remains at rest at B. B) moves toward C with increasing speed. C) moves toward C with a steady speed. D) moves toward A with increasing speed. E) moves toward A with a steady speed.
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Electric Potential You do not need to take into account the different components when calculating potential (since it is a scalar). This makes it much easier than calculating the electric field due to multiple charges. Many times this is the way to eventually calculate the electric field. When calculating the electric potential due to multiple charges, just sum up the various contributions: V Tot = V i i = 1 n ! V Tot = k e q i r i i = 1 n !
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Electric Potential Example Twelve protons are uniformly placed in a circle of radius R = 1.5cm around point C. What is the electric potential at point C? Answer Direction doesn’t matter when it comes to potential (and all the charges are equidistant from C).
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Electric Potential Answer We can then use: Much easier to calculate than electric field. But this result tells only one piece of information and thus it would be incomplete if we wanted to do something useful with it. V Tot = V i i = 1 12 ! = 12 V 1 V 1 = k + e R V 1 = 8.99 ! 10 9 N " m 2 C 2 ( ) 1.60 ! 10 # 19 C ( ) 1.5 ! 10 # 2 m ( ) = 9.6 ! 10 # 8 V V Tot = 12 9.6 ! 10 " 8 V ( ) = 1.2 ! 10 " 6 V
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Electric Potential Because many configurations (with different electric fields) can give you the same result. You would have to find the electric potential at another place in order to find the electric field. Because what matters is how the electric field is changing with respect to location.
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Continuous Distributions But if you have a continuous charge distribution, then you need to divide the distribution into very small (differential) elements of charge.
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