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The feeling of immortality that nick briefly

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Unformatted text preview: The feeling of immortality that Nick briefly experiences is juvenile and shows that he is not at a mature age. Even the environment he surrounded by shows how Nick would have the feeling of immortality, “The sun was coming up over the hills. A bass jumped, making a circle in the water…It felt warm in the sharp chill of the morning (Hemingway 19). Aside from the violence he just experienced, this serene setting, with a new day starting, gives Nick the impression that nothing could ever go wrong. Further in Hemingway’s novel, he depicts an image of Nick actually in war and introduces very graphic scenes 47 Jung describing it. In one of the vignettes, named “Chapter VI”, Nick was physically hurt, “Nick sat against the wall of the church where they had dragged him to be clear machine- gun fire…he had been hit in the spine” (Hemingway 63). It is hard for Nick to be the same person and look at life and death the same way after getting severely hurt and facing death everyday. His experiences at war clearly have a negative effect on his character. The last short story, “Big Two-Hearted River” depicts his change because it takes place after Nick returns from war and it is obvious in the way Nick acts and thinks. In Philip Young’s essay, Adventures of Nick Adams , he highlights this point through his analysis of Nick. As mentioned by Young, “‘Big Two-Hearted River’ presents a picture of a sick man, and of a man who is in escape…Nick obviously knows what is the matter… he must keep himself physically occupied” (Young 19). The traumatic events that Nick experiences at war make it hard for him to do normal, everyday tasks. He always needs to keep himself occupied with something, whether it is fishing, or cooking. He also changes the way in which he carries out his actions. It is very step-by-step and methodical. Aside from physical changes, the war also mentally changes Nick. He thinks more simply than before, not concerning himself with irrelevant worries, “He had not been unhappy all day. This was different though. Now things were done. There had been this to do. Now it was done” (Hemingway 139). Nick’s main mental focus is on what immediately lies ahead of him, not what will happen years from now. He focuses only on his own happiness and needs aside from others. All of the circumstances in the last story are related “to the man’s past: the blows which he have suffered – physical, psychical, moral, spiritual, and emotional” (Young 19). Clearly as Nick progresses as a character, there appears to be change in his personality. Before he was naïve and unaware of the real world, but after 48 the war he is well aware of death and the importance of life. He wants to live his life simply and part of that results as an escape from the stress of being in the war....
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The feeling of immortality that Nick briefly experiences is...

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