What political power does he hold if any Is it similar to political power held

What political power does he hold if any is it

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gifts to other tribes. What political power does he hold, if any? Is it similar to political power held in the U.S. Why or why not?Ongka was seen as an informal political man who was in charge of his tribe and the preparation of the big Moka. But he did not have the power to demand his tribe but rather persuade them and talk to them into working hard and preparing for the big Moka. And I do not think it is a similar political power in the US, because the Kawelka
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tribe did not have a define rules or laws that regulates the tribe. They were merely informal laws, and if Ongka was demanding power, his tribe would rebel and not follow his commands. In the US, we have to follow the regulations and laws regardless whether or not we liked it. If we did not follow the law, we would receive punishments. Define a Moka. What is its function?It’s a gift exchange system that consist of mainly pigs, and is considered valuable in the highlanders because it gains them prestige. Ongka wanted to prepare a big Moka to gain himself and his tribe a high social status. If a tribe gives a big Moka to another tribe, the other tribe needs to give back a bigger Moka. Is there anything like this in the U.S. – discuss.The only example that I can think of that is similar to the Moka is donations, especially from companies. When a company donates a large sum this company would receive respectful views. It does not expect anything back but what it would potentially get in return is more customers, which could mean more profit. What is the social structure like among the Kawelka (e.g., family and marriages)?The Kawelka tribe is a small tribe where men and women can marry each other, and men usually sleep in different huts away from their wives. Men are allowed to marry more than one woman, and we can see that because Ongka had 4 wives. Men’s role in the Kawelka tribe is different from women; men are responsible for working in the field to grow plants and food, whereas women are responsible for looking after pigs and their own children.
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  • Fall '07
  • COCHRANE
  • Anthropology, Ongka, big moka, Joseph Sargent, Moka

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