September 17 resulted in the death of several British troops and the capture of

September 17 resulted in the death of several british

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 4 pages.

September 17 resulted in the death of several British troops and the capture of about 20. A week prior to the battle, on September 12, General Horatio Gates moved his 7,000 troops to Bemis Heights to fortify their position. On September 19 at 11:00 AM, American patrols observed the deployment of three British columns. The British had planned to advance southward toward Freeman’s Farm in three columns each led by Generals Fraser, Hamilton, and Riedesel. The American forces eventually lost ground to the British which was a minor failure in a relatively indecisive battle. Although General Burgoyne had won the battle, his troops were exhausted. Despite the fact that this battle
was not an American victory, this battle was not a complete defeat. They had exhausted the British troops and had provided the British with many costly losses. General Fraser, a lead General under Burgoyne, was severely injured because of the American assault. This battle also laid the foundation for them to shock the world in the final battle of Saratoga.The day after the Battle of Freeman’s Farm ended, the Battle of Bemis Heights began. On September 20, American forces focused on reorganizing following their minor defeat at Freeman’s Farm. Meanwhile, General Burgoyne received a message from Sir Henry Clinton describing his battle plans in which the British troops would attack the American forts along the Hudson River. Over the next two weeks, Continental forces stayed at Bemis Heights. General Gates tracked the British movement through an outpost system. The Americans kept a constant pressure on the British by firing at them with small patrols. At this same time, the British and General Burgoyne redirected their troops into three columns: the Great Redoubt at the Hudson River bank, the Balcarres Redoubt south of Freeman's Farm, and the Breymann Redoubt. During this interim period, General Burgoyne’s troops were on half rations of food, were exposed to the freezing cold, and were exhausted from fighting. These conditions led to a dramatic decline in troop numbers. Over this two week period, British troops had dwindled from 8,000 to a mere 5,000. On October 4th, just three days before the battle, General Burgoyne called for a council of war with his three generals: Fraser, Riedesel, and Phillips. Burgoyne then presented plans for a second reconnaissance which said that if the American were too well fortified, they would retreat on October 11th to Battenkill. After all of this preparation, the actual battle finally occurred. The British advanced in three columns of 1,500 troops and had an auxiliary complement of 600 men. At this time, Gates learned from Lieutenant Colonel James Wilkinson that British forces were forming along Mill Creek. In response to this and following Captain Morgan’s suggestion, Gates deployed units of Captains Morgan and Poor to meet the British

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture