asthma morbidity and have greater barriers including access to health care

Asthma morbidity and have greater barriers including

This preview shows page 4 - 6 out of 9 pages.

asthma morbidity and have greater barriers including access to health care, stress and environmental exposures due to poverty (Forno & Celedon, 2009). Low-income, inner-city households have an increased level of allergens such as cockroach, dust mites, smoke and mold increasing the morbidity rate in asthma (Beck, Arrieta, Pinzon, Ortiz, Dean, Cuddihy & Gasana, 2018). A lack of sufficient health insurance has adverse repercussions on asthma management through barriers to accurately diagnosis and treat according to Forno and Celedon (2009). Socioeconomic status (SES) and exposure to stress and violence as well as existing disease factors like obesity and depression play a significant role in asthma and the mediating ethnic differences (Forno & Celedon, 2009). Asthma Diagnosis The advanced practice nurse will obtain a detailed physical assessment, family history, history or current use of tobacco, allergies, environmental exposure that triggers symptoms, current patient medication, chest X-ray, CT scan, ABG, sputum test, lifestyle behaviors, and patient symptoms. Assessments based on pulmonary function testing; spirometry, peak airflow, provocation tests, and the measurement of nitric oxide as well as comparing the results. Treatment of Asthma
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5 Asthma treatment and management require comprehensive education. Advanced practice nurses need to educate patients to reduce allergens and irritants exposure. Not everyone with asthma has the same course of treatment, medication, or education level. Short-acting and long- acting medications need to be examined and a plan of care determined by the patient, family and advanced practice nurse. The overall goal is to control asthma since asthma cannot be cured. Preventing the symptoms of coughing and shortness of breath with a peak flow meter as a measuring tool. Maintaining proper lung function and preventing asthma attacks include inhaled corticosteroid, bronchodilator, anti-inflammatory medications, and short-acting beta agonists (Hu & Cantarero, 2016). When corticosteroids do not provide therapeutic relief, a leukotriene antagonist or long-acting beta-agonists (LABA) can be administered for severe asthma exacerbation (Hu & Cantarero, 2016). Another method is immunotherapy and monoclonal IgE antibodies to reduce acute exacerbations according to Matucci, Vultaggio, and Danesi, (2018).
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  • Fall '17
  • keisha lovence

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