Southern economy was held back by dependence on

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Southern economy was held back by dependence on northern finance capital, continued reliance on cotton production, and the legacy of slavery Internal ColonyoIn 1870, A new group of Southerners insisted that the south flourished in coal, iron, turpentine, tobacco, and lumber, envisioning a new south where modern textile mills operated efficiently and profitably unrestricted by unions or legal limitations oForcefully promoted industrial development and welcomed northern investorsoNorthern investors secured huge businesses from southern state legislatures , including land, forest, and mineral rights and large tax exemptions and owning railroad landoBy late 1870’s southern merchants began to run iron factoriesaround Alabama, encroaching on northeastern market. Andrew Carnegie, the strip the competition, ordered railroads to charge higher freight fees to Alabama iron producers and the U.S. steel corporation simply bought out the local merchants and took over Production of cotton textiles followed a similar courseSouthern industry remained largely extractive, and ruralBy 1920 many northern investors held much of the south’s wealth, after moving their operations to the south for major textile mills
oSouthern enterprises mainly produced raw materials for consumption or use in the North, thereby making an economicbalance between the 2 sections. °Southern Labor Advancement of southern industry did little to improve the working lives of AA, where although the majority continued to work in ag, large numbers found jobs in industries like railroadoSome gained skilled positions as bricklayers, carpenters, an painters in booming cities oFor the most part though, they were limited to unskilled, low-paying jobsoNearly all AA women earned wages as household workers and girls as young as 10 worked as domestics or as nurses for white children oMost trade unions refused membership to black workersoIn 1880’s the Knights of Labor briefly organized both black and white workers but were forced to retreat when white politicians and local newspapers raised awareness against black dominationoWages throughout the South were low for both black and white workersBlack men earned at or below the poverty line of 300$ ayear, while black women rarely earned more than 120$, and white women about 220$ annually, poorest paid was childrenoAs industry expanded throughout the nation, so did the number of children earning wages Convict workforce also thrived, with AA constituting 90% suffering high mortality rates°Transformation of Piedmont Communities After 1870s long-est. farms and plantations gave way to railraod tracks, textile factories, numerous mill villages, and a few sizable cities All affairs of the village and the conditions of living of all the people were regulated entirely by the mill company Millworkers endured povety and health hazards by strengthening community ties through intermarriage °The Industrial city By the end of 19th

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