In some cases i have provided a url and in others

Info icon This preview shows pages 2–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
supplemental cases. In some cases I have provided a url and in others materials will be available on the Blackboard site for the class. Most Supreme Court Cases are available on- line and may be found on the Cornell Law Library site. Audio and transcripts of recent cases may be found on Oyez. Virtually all of the cases are available through Lexis a commercial databases provided by the Fordham Library. Attendance : Students are expected to attend all classes. Class Preparation and Common place entries : The practice of writing in commonplace books was common in early American and was vital to the way leading Founders learned the law. As Thomas Jefferson noted, “ I was in the habit of abridging and commonplacing what I read meriting it, and of sometimes mixing my own reflections on the subject.” Princeton historian Robert Darnton described the role of common place books in the following fashion: “Time was when readers kept commonplace books. Whenever they came across a pithy passage, they copied it into a notebook under an appropriate heading, adding observations made in the course of daily life. Erasmus instructed them how to do it . . . .The practice spread everywhere in early modern England, among ordinary readers as well as famous writers like Francis Bacon, Ben Jonson, John Milton, and John Locke. It involved a special way of taking in the printed word. Unlike 2
Image of page 2

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
modern readers, who follow the flow of a narrative from beginning to end, early modern Englishmen read in fits and starts and jumped from book to book. They broke texts into fragments and assembled them into new patterns by transcribing them in different sections of their notebooks. Then they reread the copies and rearranged the patterns while adding more excerpts. Reading and writing were therefore inseparable activities. They belonged to a continuous effort to make sense of things, for the world was full of signs: you could read your way through it; and by keeping an account of your readings, you made a book of your own, one stamped with your personality. . . . The era of the commonplace book reached its peak in the late Renaissance, although commonplacing as a practice probably began in the twelfth century and remained widespread among the Victorians. It disappeared long before the advent of the sound bite.” — Robert Darnton, “Extraordinary Commonplaces ,” The New York Review of Books , December 21, 2000 Each week you will submit the entries for your own commonplace book. For each text you should combine textual extracts with your own observations. Make sure to note the author of any passages you copy and provide a short citation to the material. We will use these reflections as the basis for much of our class discussion each week. The act of commonplacing blurred the boundary between readership and authorship. By common- placing one became an author as well as a reader. To see an excellent example of what a commonplace book looked like you can visit the Library of Congress which has copies of Jefferson’s two commonplace books—a literary one and a legal one.
Image of page 3
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern