In the genus cyathea the frond butts stipe bases have

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higher up the slopes (Garrett 1996). In the genus Cyathea the frond butts (= stipe bases) have hard protuberances and are covered in long chaffy scales, while sori are situated on the forks of veins away from the edges of the pinnules. For the other common treefern in Tasmania, Dicksonia antarctica , the frond butts are smooth and are clad with fine soft reddish-brown hairs, and the sori are marginal (Duncan & Isaac 1986, Garrett 1996). Current Status Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 : Not listed Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 : endangered King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 114
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Plate 1. Cyathea cunninghamii habit (Photograph: Oberon Carter) Figure 1. Cyathea cunninghamii : King Island distribution Existing Conservation Measures Extension surveys of suitable habitat on King Island were undertaken in 2007 and 2009 by TSS personnel as part of threatened flora verification projects funded by the NRM Regions. Distribution and Habitat Cyathea cunninghamii occurs in Tasmania, Victoria (from the Otways across into East Gippsland) and Queensland’s Lamington National Park (Duncan & Isaac 1986; Walsh & Entwisle 1994). The species is noted as being locally common in New Zealand (Brownsey & Smith-Dodsworth 1989). In Tasmania Cyathea cunninghamii has been recorded from sheltered fern gullies within a few km of the coast at altitudes less than 150 m above sea level. The largest stands are at Lower Marsh Creek in the northeast and Dalco Creek in the south. The linear range of the known extant sites in Tasmania is 480 km, with an extent of occurrence c. 70,000 km 2 (which includes large areas of unsuitable habitat), and an area of occupancy c. 20–25 ha. On King Island Cyathea cunninghamii is known from a tributary of the Grassy River (Figure 1), where it grows within a deep fern gully dominated by Acacia melanoxylon (blackwood). Associated species include Hedycarya angustifolia (Australian mulberry), Pomaderris apetala (dogwood), Cyathea australis (rough treefern), Cyathea x marcescens (skirted treefern) and Dicksonia antarctica (soft treefern). Populations Cyathea cunninghamii is known from eighteen extant subpopulations in Tasmania, with a total of about 250 mature plants (Threatened Species Section 2011b). The subpopulation on King Island is thought to consist of a solitary mature plant (5 m high) and two immature plants (1 m apart) about 100 m King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 115
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downstream (Table 1). The known subpopulation , and any new subpopulations found, are considered important for the survival of the species. Habitat critical to the survival of the species Habitat critical to the survival of Cyathea cunninghamii on King Island includes the known site and nearby potential habitat, as represented by all creeklines within the Grassy River catchment. Table 1. Population summary for Cyathea cunninghamii on King Island Location Tenure NRM regio n 1:25 000 mapshee t Year last (first ) seen Area occupie d (ha) Number of mature plants (& juveniles) 1 Grassy River Private Cradl e Coast Grassy 2007 (1990 ) 0.1 1 (2) Reservation Status Cyathea cunninghamii
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  • Fall '14
  • The Hours, ........., Threatened species, Bass Strait, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, King Island

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