14 After the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor President Roosevelt signed an

14 after the surprise attack on pearl harbor

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14. After the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt signed an executive order requiring all people of Japanese descent living on the West Coast—even those who were United States citizens—to be uprooted from their homes and sent to internment camps for the duration of the ________. 15. Ansel Adams photographed the Manzanar internment camp. He wrote, “We must prosecute this war with all…ruthless efficiency , but we must be certain that, as the rights of the individual are the most sacred elements of our society, we will not allow passion, vengeance, hatred, and
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______________ antagonism to cloud the principles of universal justice and mercy.” 16. What follows is a series of letters from the wife of a man who had been taken away from his home in the first hours after Pearl Harbor and relocated to an internment camp in Montana. They had settled near Seattle and had visited Mount Rainier National Park more than 100 times. (There is nothing to fill in, I’m just providing background for this section of the video.) 17. Next, we learn of the fate of Chiura Obata, a famous landscape artist. He wrote, “The sudden burst of Pearl Harbor was is if the mother earth on which we stood was swept by the terrific force of a big wave of resentment of the American people. Our dignity and our __________ were crushed.” (What follows are a series of his paintings.) 18. His granddaughter is interviewed and she notes that Obata advocated that those incarcerated could lift their spirits by looking at the mountains that surrounded them (and not down at the desert dust). He said, “I still feel __________________ and nurtured by great nature.” 19. One of his paintings, Moonlight Over Topaz , was given to the President’s wife, Eleanor Roosevelt, in thanks for her speaking out for _______ treatment of Japanese Americans. 20. Years later, in remembrance of his personal ordeal, Obata would paint Glorious Struggle , the image of a tree (sequoia) in Yosemite’s High Sierra whose own struggle to survive seemed to give him ______________ and hope in his darkest hour. 21. Reflecting on this painting, and others with sequoias as the subject, his granddaughter says, “He saw the life of a person in these trees. No matter the storms and trials of life, these trees _____________ with great dignity and great strength.” 22. I think this quote, by Chiura Obata, that ends this episode is poetic. Here it is: “In such times I heard the gentle but strong whisper of the Sequoia gigantean : ‘Hear me, you poor man. I’ve stood here more than three thousand and seven hundred years in rain, snow, storm, and even mountain fire still keeping my thankful attitude strongly with nature—do not cry, do not spend your time and energy worrying. You have _____________ following. Keep up your unity; come with me.’” (Note: Manzanar is now a unit of the National Park system.) Episode 5, Chapter 12 “My Country ‘Tis of Thee” 1. In the midst of Franklin Roosevelt’s presidency, the world-renowned contralto Marian Anderson had been denied the opportunity to perform in Constitution Hall, the four-thousand-seat
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  • Jillian Maloney
  • National Park Service, John Muir, Yosemite National Park, National Parks

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