Asian-American Lit Essay 1.docx

The containment of dangerous contagious diseases the

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the containment of dangerous, contagious diseases; the disease in this case being ‘disloyalty’ to the United States of America. Okubo uses the word ‘family’ in different forms thrice in the second sentence. The major emphasis on keeping families together, is counterproductive to the government’s simultaneous 2
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effort of trying to separate Japanese Americans from society. The preservation and registration of a family under one name, albeit a number, is still an incongruous way to prevent the circulation of disloyalty. A family environment will harbour the same ideals and values, ones that will most likely be passed down to the younger generation; nurturing such an environment was hypocritical of the government’s plan to inhibit Japanese culture and values in the first place. On a personal level for Okubo, after the death of her mother, and the separation from her other siblings; the attempt made to conserve a family is greeted with a hint of scoff. Okubo states how she reported to “Pilgrim Hall of the First Congregational Church” of Berkeley. If read once, Okubo’s diction comes off as dry and purely full of facts meant to enlighten the reader. Once read multiple times, the reader recognizes an ever-present tone of playfulness; Okubo is quick to astutely point out ironical situations in her surroundings, and is shrewd in her way of discussing them. For example, the Pilgrims were the first Europeans to permanently settle in New England; they escaped religious persecution back home and came to America in search for new opportunities. It is symbolic how she, a first generation immigrant, was there to register for her brother and herself, a family unit of two, for involuntary
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