3 in the north it led to immediate responses in the

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(3) IN THE NORTH: It led to immediate responses in the North by people who were outraged in particular by the new Fugitive Slave Law. (4) Many in the North hated “kidnappers” in their midst, especially when the federal government not only condoned their actions but actively supported them. (5) Many Northerners recommitted to the Underground Railroad and moved the station’s terminus to Canada. (6) Many Northern states passed “Personal Liberty Laws” that prohibited the use of any state resources in support of federal enforcement of the Fugitive Slave Law CONSEQUENCE #3 : (7) IN THE SOUTH: THREE EVENTS outraged the South. ** Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852): (8) This anti- slavery novel inflamed attitudes in both the North and the South. ** Frederick Douglass’ (July 4, 1852) Speech: (9) Douglass was invited to speak in Rochester, New York to honor the United States on its birthday. (10) Douglass used the occasion to spell out why black people could not celebrate the birth of the U.S. and why the U.S. was the embodiment of hypocrisy. ** The Anthony Burns Incident (1854 ) : (11) Burns was arrested under the new Fugitive Slave Law in Boston in 1850. (12) A mob of Bostonian abolitionists made an unsuccessful attempt to rescue Burns from federal officials. (13) Two thousand federal troops and $40,000 were needed to return Burns to his Southern master. (14) People were so aroused that no fugitive slave was ever again returned from Massachusetts. THE RESULT: (15) Abolitionist forces in the North were able to win converts to their position that the South, the Slave Power, was conspiring to take over the nation. (16) Southern planters were able to argue that the North was conspiring to take control of the national government, outlaw slavery, and totally destroy the southern way of life. (17) Thus, a polarization of positions between both sides was in place, hardly the result most supporters of the Compromise of 1850 had hoped for. 9. What was the Great Triumvirate? Why was it significant, especially at this moment of history? (1) Between 1850-1852 as the nation faced one severe crisis after another, the nation needed its best intersectional (national) political minds to work out these quite complex problems. (2) Yet, the three national leaders who might have been able to meet this challenge—the Great Triumvirate: Clay, Webster, and Calhoun—all
died. (3) Thus, a new group of political leaders arose who were more dedicated to sectional interests, than national unity. B. DEVELOPMENT #2: THE BREAKDOWN AND DESTRUCTION OF THE INTERSECTIONAL/NATIONAL POLITICAL PARTY SYSTEM 1852-1856 1. What were the general causes of the breakdown in national parties at this time?
Originally written by Chris Miller Updated by Tony Saavedra 16

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