AminataFunchess BUS-518 assign3.docx

23 if i were in littles position i would not threaten

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to the challenge, impossible as it may have seemed at the time” (Laufer, 2012, p. 23). If I were in Little’s position I would not threaten the staff with the loss of their job in the first introduction meeting. The Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile program was going to be eliminated if the program was not brought back on track. I would have provided the same information to the staff but in a way, that encourages a team effort to help everyone maintain
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DEVELOPING A MISSILE: THE POWER OF AUTONOMY AND LEARNING 3 their jobs. For example, instead of stating “We’re going to be on track by July, and anybody who’s not onboard with that might as well look for another job” (Laufer, 2012, p. 23), I would have said, look to your left and your right because one of your fellow employees might not be here if we don’t get this project back on track. Let’s all make sure that no one here loses their job by providing our best effort possible. I would have attempted to make it about the team and looking out for one another instead of using scare tactics. “If your emotional outbursts simply provoke another emotional reaction -- like fear -- nobody benefits” ("Employee Motivation: Fear is Not a Motivator | Monster.com," 2012). Describe the fallacies, consistencies, and inconsistencies that emerged from Terry Little’s leadership tactics, geared toward inspiring the team to greater heights. Construct an argument for how you would have acted differently than Terry Little and support the position. The fallacies that Little had was the belief that being harsh and somewhat threatening to achieve goals was necessary and being more lenient towards women. Little had expressed a harsh and threatening attitude when he initially introduced himself to the new team members of The Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile Program. Little’s first statements before he introduced himself was to advise the team that if they didn’t complete the program in 6 months they could look for another job immediately. He believed that he couldn’t reach people if he wasn’t stern and threatening based on his previous behavior on other projects. Little was not aware that threatening staff was not the best tactic in motivating individuals to achieve the desired goal. The consistencies that Little expressed were those of trusting his team members with the assigned tasks and making sure that he provided all the support needed to make their jobs easier. Little’s philosophy was to inform employees what was expected of them and then allow them to
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DEVELOPING A MISSILE: THE POWER OF AUTONOMY AND LEARNING 4 complete their job without constant supervision. “When someone is new and I haven’t taken the full measure of them yet, I will ask him or her to let me know what’s going on, what they’ve decided- but after I am comfortable with their judgement, I believe in giving them the freedom they need to do their job” (Laufer, 2012, p. 25). This was a consistent thread woven into Little’s leadership style. He explained the task and its requirements then trusted his employees to make the necessary decisions to accomplish the goal.
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  • Fall '14
  • Project Management, Project team, Terry Little, Little, Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile, Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff

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