Search Of Africa Manthia Diawara explains that hip hop is really a voice of

Search of africa manthia diawara explains that hip

This preview shows page 2 - 4 out of 6 pages.

Search Of Africa, Manthia Diawara explains that hip hop is really a voice of people who are down and out in modern society. He argues that the "worldwide spread of hip-hop as a market revolution" is actually global "expression of poor people’s desire for the good life," and that this struggle aligns with "the nationalist struggle for citizenship and belonging, but also reveals the need to go beyond such struggles and celebrate the redemption of the black individual through tradition." This connection to "tradition" however, is something that may be lacking according to one Satellite Academy staff member who says that in all of the focus on materialism, the hip hop community is “not leaving anything for the next generation, we’re not building.” As the hip hop genre turns 30, a deeper analysis of the music’s impact is taking place. It has been viewed as a cultural sensation which changed the music industry around the world, but some believe commercialization and mass production have given it a darker side. Tate has described its recent manifestations as a marriage of “New World African ingenuity and that trick of the devil known as global-hyper-capitalism”, arguing it has joined the “mainstream that had once excluded its originators.” While hip hop's values
Image of page 2
may have changed over time, the music continues to offer its followers and originators a shared identity which is instantly recognizable and much imitated around the world. THE AUDACITY OF HIP HOP- From Hip Hop World by Dalton Higgins #2 Essay basis for Test It’s a hip hop world, and you’re just living in it. For most music-addicted earthlings, hip hop culture is the predominant global youth subculture of today. For the non-music initiated, hip hop has become the black, jewelry-laden elephant in a room filled with rock, country and classical music — an attention- grabber whose influence is impossible to miss on the daily news, in school playgrounds, during water cooler conversations or in a political debate. What is hip hop, and why should you care about it? Hip hop — a term coined by pioneering rapper Space Cowboy in the early 1970s to mimic a scat and then popularized later by rapper Lovebug Starski -- is quite simply the world’s leading counterculture, subculture and youth culture. Hip hop encompasses four distinct elements: deejaying (the manipulation of pre-recorded music), B- boyin' (dance), rapping/emceeing (vocalizing) and graffiti (visual art). For starters, curious onlookers have to acknowledge its success as a massive chart-topping, revenue-generating music movement. When rapper Jay-Z’s (Shawn Carter) American Gangster disc opened on top of the pop charts in 2007, that gave him ten Billboard number one albums in ten years, tying him with the King of Rock, Elvis Presley, for the most chart-toppers by a solo artist (now up to eleven billboard #1's- p.w.) Likewise, at a time when CD sales are plummeting, rapper Lil’ Wayne’s Tha Carter III was the number one selling album of 2008 in the US, scanning an astounding three million units.
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture