You will need to bring a 2 pencil a scientific calculator and your student ID

You will need to bring a 2 pencil a scientific

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 19 pages.

You will need to bring a #2 pencil, a scientific calculator, and your student ID. NO OTHER DEVICES OR MATERIALS WILL BE PERMITTED--THIS INCLUDES CELL PHONES, TABLETS, HEADPHONES, TEXTBOOKS, AND HANDOUTS (INCLUDING ANY FREE EXAM QUESTIONS). If your calculator has any notes programmed into it, you will need to delete them. If you need a device to keep track of time, bring a watch since cell phones will not be allowed. If you do not know what your Affiliate ID is, ask your TA or instructor well in advance of the exam. During the exam, please help the proctors avoid all suspicion by not leaving your Scantron and test booklet within site of your neighbors. Early exams are only possible for those with a very good, documented reason for missing the regular time. If you feel that you fall in this category, you must make arrangements with Dr. Briggs at least 5 days in advance and be prepared to present appropriate documentation (such as an official university letter) to support your absence at the normal time. Keep in mind that those taking an early exam are putting themselves at a disadvantage, as they will not benefit from the latest lecture material or review sessions. Late exams are not possible under any circumstances.Specific exam topics (broken down by chapter) are listed below:
Dr. Ron Briggs CHM 113 2 Chapter 10 (Gases) What you should know for this test: Properties of a gas The 4 variables that describe a gas (P, V, T, and n) including their meanings, most common units, and how to interconvert between units The meaning of Standard Temperature, Standard Pressure, and STP Conceptual relationships between P, V, T, and n according to Boyle’s Law, Charles’ Law, and Avogadro’s Law (i.e. which variables are inversely and directly proportional) How to use the Ideal Gas Law to solve numerical problems How to use the Ideal Gas Law to solve for mass, initial/final values when a gas undergoes a change in P, V, T, and gas density The differences between a Real and an Ideal Gas Limitations of the Ideal Gas Law and the assumptions made How to use the Van der Waals equation to calculate gas variables and the significant differences from the Ideal Gas Law When and how to use Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressure How to solve stoichiometry problems in the gas phase Definition and five key points of the Kinetic-Molecular Theory (KMT) The relationship between pressure and collisions The relationship between temperature and average speed and kinetic energy The meanings of effusion and diffusion and what factors affect each What will not be on this test: N/A Chapter 11 (Intermolecular Forces) What you should know for this test: Meaning of intermolecular forces (and the difference from intramolecular forces) What a dipole-dipole interaction is and how to predict the relative strengths of such an interaction What London Dispersion Forces are and how to predict the relative strengths of such interactions What a hydrogen bond is and when they can occur

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture